We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.
Description: In this class you will learn, through demonstrations and exercises, the fundamentals of carving that will provide a solid foundation for all types of carving. Learn about carving materials and tools, how to sharpen and get the most out of each tool, how to read and carve in relation to wood grain, how to set up a work station, and about different styles of carving. Together we'll execute, beads, rosettes, volutes, "C" scroll, and more. You'll leave with the understanding and confidence to grow and explore with this new found skill!
These things may be tiny in size, but building one is not that easy. It takes some serious woodworking knowledge and skill to build a nice wooden mobile stand. When I first saw one online, I just couldn’t resist thinking of buying one. But when I saw the price, I was forced to rethink. Also, a woodwork lover like me cannot be contained with just one piece and I was not willing to spend on more than one. So instead I decided to build myself one. Yes, it took some doing but the final result was satisfying. Luckily, I found this awesome tutorial online that helped me build my first ever wooden phone holder.
With a variety of styles covering every skill-level, the Great Book of Woodworking Projects has something for everyone. Whether you want a challenging project that will beautify your home, such as a stunning Stickley chest of drawers, or you need a quick and easy project for a gift, such as a keepsake box or picture frame, you will find plans that will take a few hours or a weekend to complete.
Description: In this class, Ray explains through demonstration the proper use, the making of all the joints used in 18th century furniture construction. The different types of dovetails, mortise and tenons, bridle joints, and others. While machine alternative methods will be discussed our focus will be on the use of hand tools to cut each joint. After watching the procedure demonstrated each student will be coached through their first attempt at each joint using their own hand tools. Learn how to properly and accurately layout and cut the perfect fitting joint! The best part is that these methods can be used on any style of furniture you wish to make ensuring they will last well over 200 years!
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