$1250.00 (Includes All Materials)          . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) This six day sculpted chair class will definitely broaden and raise your woodworking skills a few notches. The class will cover topics such as chair joinery, design, placement of back spindle for comfort, defining hard and soft lines, sculpting using various methods such as grinder, rasps, gouges, scrapers and spoke shaves. Cherry wood will be prepared for you before you arrive to save…
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Making an art or a design on a wooden piece is a hectic task and requires good art skills. But there is another much easier way to carve a beautiful art on any wood surface. For this, you will need the image or graphic that you want to transfer, a piece of wood, freezer paper, etc. I, myself have made several such designs. At the source below, you can find a step by step guide for transferring a graphic image to the wood.
$375.00 (Includes all Materials)          . $100.00 Deposit  (Balance due 30 days before class) This class will give every student a thorough understanding of the finishing process. It will cover all aspects of wood finishing: Proper sanding techniques, coloring wood (dyes, stains, chemical and plant dyes), color-matching, membrane finishes (shellac, varnish, lacquer) and understanding solvents and their use in the finishing process. We will also explore hand-rubbed finishes, shading and toning, making your own custom stains and…
$360.00 (Includes all Materials except the Plane) $100.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) In this two day class we will reveal some of the secrets to tuning up a Japanese Hand Plane (Kanna) We will start with conditioning the Body of the Plane (DAI) to stabilize movement. Proper sharpening and grinding of the blade and chip breaker will be discussed and demonstrated. Custom fitting the blade to the Dai and conditioning the sole. We will also demystified the…
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a rule?
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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