Description: The intent of this class is to learn the basic skills and underlying principles used to construct an end grain board. This can be a cutting board, cheese board, butcher block, etc. The class is in three sessions because there are two overnight glue ups required. Day 1 we will discuss why to construct something end grain; how to prevent cracking; types of wood to use (and not use); required tools and their safe use; how to layout the board; performing the initial preparation of the stock and first glue up. Day 2 consists of cleaning the board up, cutting and arranging it into the desired final pattern, and the second glue up. Day 3 will be the final clean up; trimming; final sanding; edge routing/sanding; a discussion on finishes and how to maintain the board.
Build your own platform bed frame at your home by following the source linked tutorial given above. The source link also includes more pictures that can help you to build a better bed frame. You can see a step by step set of instructions and guidelines to follow with real life pictures, as well as you can download a PDF file detailing the list of materials and tools you’ll need, know about the length of every board, and most importantly color-coded illustrations of the building process.
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
Description: Normally we use the lathe to turn perfectly round spindles or vessels "on axis". By changing the axis of rotation during a turning project, very interesting and unusual shapes develop. During this class students will learn the basic concepts that make this style of turning so unique. This knowledge can then be incorporated into your future spindle and face plate projects.
$1125.00 (Includes All Materials)          . Deposit $300.00  (Balance due 30 days before class) In this class we will explore the works of one of my favorite woodworkers, George Nakashima. This chair has elegance, simplicity, subtle details, and beauty. Don't let its simplicity fool you. This chair requires great skill and precision to execute. It involves carving and sculpting of the seat with power and hand tools. The complex joinery has to be done accurately to ensure…
Description: In this class period furniture maker Ray Journigan will show you why there were so many different types of planes and what each one was used for. Through demonstrations, he will show you why the most expensive plane is NOT necessary to get a perfect surface. Watch his procedure of making rough lumber turn into glass smooth, finish ready surfaces in just minutes, no sanding necessary! Ever wonder what to look for in a flea marker plane? How to sharpen it for razor thin shavings? How to set it up properly? What makes one plane better than another? Come see why every shop needs a good hand plane no matter what style furniture you make. If you are thinking about incorporating hand tools into your work, take this class before you buy your first hand plane.
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
$375.00 (Includes all Materials)          . $100.00 Deposit  (Balance due 30 days before class) This class will give every student a thorough understanding of the finishing process. It will cover all aspects of wood finishing: Proper sanding techniques, coloring wood (dyes, stains, chemical and plant dyes), color-matching, membrane finishes (shellac, varnish, lacquer) and understanding solvents and their use in the finishing process. We will also explore hand-rubbed finishes, shading and toning, making your own custom stains and…
Description: Normally we use the lathe to turn perfectly round spindles or vessels "on axis". By changing the axis of rotation during a turning project, very interesting and unusual shapes develop. During this class students will learn the basic concepts that make this style of turning so unique. This knowledge can then be incorporated into your future spindle and face plate projects.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
Description: In this information packed class, Brian will show you all you need to know to add turned elements to your next furniture project. While basic spindle turning will be covered in depth, you will also learn some unorthodox methods "cheaters" to achieve success. Reproducing parts without a duplicator will be covered. You will also learn what tool to choose for a particular job, how they are sharpened, offset turned legs, split turnings, and much more. With practice exercises, you will gain confidence with the gouge, scraper, and skew. After taking this class you will turn that scrap pile into more money or memories as they become candle stands or chess pieces.
These things may be tiny in size, but building one is not that easy. It takes some serious woodworking knowledge and skill to build a nice wooden mobile stand. When I first saw one online, I just couldn’t resist thinking of buying one. But when I saw the price, I was forced to rethink. Also, a woodwork lover like me cannot be contained with just one piece and I was not willing to spend on more than one. So instead I decided to build myself one. Yes, it took some doing but the final result was satisfying. Luckily, I found this awesome tutorial online that helped me build my first ever wooden phone holder.
Turning an old door into a photo frame is another easy woodwork project. All you need is an old door and some woodworking tools and items. I am here sharing the link to the source tutorial that explains the step by step procedure for building a picture frame from an old wooden door. This tutorial was originally written by Tracy Snyder at athomewithsweett.blogspot.com who also tells you what items you may need and where to find them. If you haven’t already got an old door, you can purchase one from websites like Craigslist.
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