The mission of the Fine Woodworking Department is to provide our students with opportunities for growth and development that set the foundation for life-long learning, academic achievement, and career accomplishment. We do this through three quality educational programs; traditional woodworking, advanced woodworking technology and lutherie. We encourage a passion for learning, through creativity, a commitment to excellence, and dedication to our students, and the communities we serve.

Description: In this two day carving class the student will learn about the different styles of and how ball & claw feet were used on furniture of the 18th century. Come let Master carver and 2018 "Cartouche" winner Ray Journigan guide each student, even those will little carving experience, through the successful execution of carving a Philadelphia style Ball & Claw foot. Methods of layout, clamping, and tool sharpening will also be covered.
This is another example of small woodwork projects that require good time and woodworking skills. This item is built using multiple wooden parts. Each part is shaped in a specific design and then all parts are attached together to make the final TV set. I have never tried building this one, mostly because I don’t own an iPhone, but also because making this item is not an easy task. By the way, it works fine with all kinds of phones.
Description: In this information packed class, Brian will show you all you need to know to add turned elements to your next furniture project. While basic spindle turning will be covered in depth, you will also learn some unorthodox methods "cheaters" to achieve success. Reproducing parts without a duplicator will be covered. You will also learn what tool to choose for a particular job, how they are sharpened, offset turned legs, split turnings, and much more. With practice exercises, you will gain confidence with the gouge, scraper, and skew. After taking this class you will turn that scrap pile into more money or memories as they become candle stands or chess pieces.

Although refrigerators long ago rendered them obsolete, antique oak ice boxes remain popular with collectors, even though they’re expensive and hard to find. This do-it-yourself version is neither: it’s both inexpensive and easy to build. An authentic reproduction of an original, the project is especially popular when used as a bar, but it has many
Why would you buy a costly platform bed from Ikea or somewhere else when you can make one yourself at home? Oh yes, you can. A bed is the most common furniture piece used in the house and probably the costliest one. Wouldn’t it be great if you could just make a bed of your own, without having to spend many bucks for buying one? So I am here sharing a great tutorial to help you to build a nice comfy platform bed that you can use anywhere in the house.
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