The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Description: Have you ever gone to one of those expensive framing shops and been taken back by the cost of a picture frame? Here is the opportunity to learn how to make your own frames and save money. The Picture Framing class will show you the basics for measuring and making your own picture frames. You will be shown how to use woodworking joinery that can be incorporated in your framing projects which are not only functional, but decorative as well. You will use the jointer and table saw to square stock, the table saw and the electric miter saw to cut mitered corners, and the router table to create assorted decorative profiles for your frames. Students will make the components for an 8" X 10" picture frame.
Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.
Description: Sharp tools make all aspects of woodworking more enjoyable. But keeping them sharp has been a point of frustration that has steered many away from using them. This class will teach the techniques needed to maintain a sharp edge on your flat bench tools. In this class, all methods of sharpening will be discussed i.e. water stones, oil stones, wet/dry sandpaper, diamond stones and motorized discs. The use of honing compounds and strops will also be discussed. Come out and gain the skill and confidence needed to put a razor edge on all your bench tools.

Description: Do you and your significant other want to le3arn basic wood working skills and have fun creating a one of a kind project together? We will provide the food, soft drinks, and materials. You only need to show up and be ready to make some saw dust. Projects will vary from month to month and will consist of small projects such as pens, bottle stoppers/openers, pepper grinders, etc.


There’s a lot of space above the shelf in most closets. Even though it’s a little hard to reach, it’s a great place to store seldom-used items. Make use of this wasted space by adding a second shelf above the existing one. Buy enough closet shelving material to match the length of the existing shelf plus enough for two end supports and middle supports over each bracket. Twelve-inch-wide shelving is available in various lengths and finishes at home centers and lumberyards.
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.

Description: Painted furniture is all the rave today. Using Black Dog Furniture Paint, come learn how to transform those yard sale finds, thrift store picks or your grandmother's hand me downs into unique beautiful treasures for your home. Bring a small piece of furniture (chair, small side table etc.) that is good condition (no major repairs etc.) and we will provide the rest of supplies needed to transform your trash to treasure. Student can email a photo of furniture to instructor prior to class to make sure that it is suitable piece to paint). In this class you will learn the basics of prepping, painting, distressing, waxing and sealing.


Description: Do you and your significant other want to learn basic wood working skills and have fun creating a one of a kind project together? We will provide the food, soft drinks, and materials. You only need to show up and be ready to make some saw dust. Projects will vary from month to month and will consist of small projects such as pens, bottle stoppers/openers, pepper grinders, etc.

Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
$875.00 (Includes all Materials)         . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) We have an exceptional opportunity offering a class taught by David A Wade, who had worked along side Sam Maloof for over 25 years. David sculpted many of Sam’s creations from the iconic sculpted rocking chair to the sculpted table. Many refer to sculpted Maloof pieces as “sensuous” and are drawn to touch his works. Every woodworker desiring to enhance their craft will benefit…

Description: This class is designed for beginning woodworkers or those who have been away from their hobby for some time. Students will have a chance to learn about different types of joints using both hand and power tools as they make their own take-home project. The course also covers subjects such as wood technology, selecting and purchasing lumber, sharpening techniques and finishing.
Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a rule?
Learn fundamentals as you work a given plan through to completion. With a focus on six essential power tools, learn properties of wood and shop etiquette, interpret a plan, cut and mill stock and use basic machine joinery. This class qualifies students for intermediate classes and for Woodworking Open Shop. It is our gateway to more advanced woodworking. Complete attendance is required to fulfill this requirement. See our withdrawal policies online. Limit 8 students
There’s something so satisfying about creating something out of nothing. That’s why we think woodworking is one of the greatest hobbies out there. You can create your very own functional pieces and add your own flare to it, feeling accomplished and proud every time you lay your eyes on your project. Plus, it’s a great way to stay under budget when decorating your home or giving beautiful gifts. In the long run, the price of lumber and tools is far less than the price of buying a piece new that would be simple to build at home.
Here, I am writing about another DIY project that involves the use of an old furniture piece. I think that the idea of reusing and recycling old furniture has got to me. Anyways, I am starting to love it. This project involves using an old door to build a beautiful multi picture frame, as you can see in the image below. This frame looks really wonderful and can be used to hold many pictures at a time.
Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
Description: Using the skew is a challenge for many turners. This class will demystify the skew and show you how to avoid the dreaded run back. Proper sharpening and cutting geometry will be demonstrated and students will learn several basic skew cuts - roughing, peeling, planing, bead and cove cuts with the skew. The student will complete the class by turning a small tool handle with just the skew.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
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