To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
Description: Want to learn the basics of wood turning or refresh your skills from Jr. High shop class? This class covers the basics, including shop and lathe safety, tool identification and selection, mounting wood to the lathe and wood selection. In the first half of the class students will turn the handle for a 1/4" turning tool to take home. In the second half they will work on a small project determined by the instructor.

Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
Yes Seriously! You can build an easy bed frame yourself without any other’s help. As everyone knows the starting point of any bedroom is a gorgeous bed. However, you also need something that lets you enjoy peaceful slumber in comfort and warmth, but since the bed took as the focal point of the room, you may need something that looks really good too.

An ideal resource for woodworkers looking for a new project or wanting to spruce up their home! From kitchen improvements and storage solutions to classic furniture in the Craftsman and Adirondack styles, the experts at American Woodworker have provided plans and instructions for building 50 great-looking projects that will improve every space inside and outside your home.
Description: This is a more in depth class about bench planes than above. In this class, let period furniture maker Ray Journigan show you how to make using a bench plane your new favorite go to tool. Lean what makes one plane better than another? Then Ray demonstrates the steps of flattening a wide board using hand planes followed by each student having the opportunity to surface a board to "finish ready" without any sanding using their hand planes. In this class we take the plane apart and explain all the adjustments to properly tune up your hand plane. Then block planes are discussed showing their importance in furniture work. Next, for those REALLY interested in learning how different types of handplanes were used, Ray will show and demonstrate the use of specialty planes such as Rabbit planes, Shoulder planes, Dado planes, Dovetail planes, Scraper planes, and molding planes. Lastly we turn our attention to sharpening to a razor edge. Student leave with an eye opening experience having learned thru practice, the joy and ease of using hand planes.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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