Description: In this class, Ray explains through demonstration the proper use, the making of all the joints used in 18th century furniture construction. The different types of dovetails, mortise and tenons, bridle joints, and others. While machine alternative methods will be discussed our focus will be on the use of hand tools to cut each joint. After watching the procedure demonstrated each student will be coached through their first attempt at each joint using their own hand tools. Learn how to properly and accurately layout and cut the perfect fitting joint! The best part is that these methods can be used on any style of furniture you wish to make ensuring they will last well over 200 years!
Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!
Description: In this information packed class, Brian will show you all you need to know to add turned elements to your next furniture project. While basic spindle turning will be covered in depth, you will also learn some unorthodox methods "cheaters" to achieve success. Reproducing parts without a duplicator will be covered. You will also learn what tool to choose for a particular job, how they are sharpened, offset turned legs, split turnings, and much more. With practice exercises, you will gain confidence with the gouge, scraper, and skew. After taking this class you will turn that scrap pile into more money or memories as they become candle stands or chess pieces.
This is definitely going to be one of the easiest woodworking projects you’ll be reading about today. So why not just get started? The tutorial link is given below. Just do exactly what they are saying in the tutorial and you will end up making a beautiful wooden doormat just like the one in the image above. They are using pine wood to build this doormat. You can choose any wood material that best suits your budget.
I built my first platform bed by following the steps mentioned in the tutorial and the end result was everything I expected. It was as beautiful as comfortable and strong. It only cost me around $60 to build this one from the scratch. And if I can build it, anyone can. What you need is a little bit of woodworking experience and a lot of confidence. Collect the items as suggested in the video and start working now.

Nightstand table plans have everything you need to create a bedside table to keep every needy thing at reach at night time. This Nigh Stand plan is quite different in design from the most of the other plans. This stand has not only the three regular drawers but also having a hidden drawer that uses a secret locking mechanism to keep contents securely.


Have you got an old whiskey barrel at home that you haven’t used for ages? If yes, this project is for you. You can make a really beautiful coffee table from that old whiskey barrel in a few easy steps. Apart from a coffee table, whiskey barrels can also be used to build several other furniture items. But that is a talk for later. Here, we will discuss how to make a coffee table from a whiskey barrel.
Description: Do you like playing bean bag toss but don't have your own set of boards? Buying a custom set can be expensive. Come take our Bean Bag Toss Game Board Class and we will show you how to make your own set of boards that you can take home and paint however you like. The class will also illustrate how a Kreg Pocket Screw Jig can build a variety of strong joints quickly. Each student will make a set of boards that lock together with storage to hold your bean bags.
Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.
This workshop introduces students to modern woodworking through an immersive experience of crafting fine wooden furniture. It is designed for beginners who want to get a hands-on introduction to woodworking and take home a beautiful product. After a brief survey of principles and process, students will dive into their projects to make a small wood...

Description: Come explore the world of chip carving! Geometric and free form designs created with a cutting knife and stab knife provide tremendous opportunities for artistic expression based on generations of tradition. This hands-on class will cover carving techniques, traditional as well as free form designs, layout and knife sharpening methods. Tools required: Chip carving cutting knife and stab knife, mechanical pencil with .5mm lead, eraser, T-square, and draftsman's compass. Recommended reading: The Complete Guide to Chip Carving by Wayne Barton.
Description: Normally we use the lathe to turn perfectly round spindles or vessels "on axis". By changing the axis of rotation during a turning project, very interesting and unusual shapes develop. During this class students will learn the basic concepts that make this style of turning so unique. This knowledge can then be incorporated into your future spindle and face plate projects.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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