Description: In this two day carving class the student will learn about the different styles of and how ball & claw feet were used on furniture of the 18th century. Come let Master carver and 2018 "Cartouche" winner Ray Journigan guide each student, even those will little carving experience, through the successful execution of carving a Philadelphia style Ball & Claw foot. Methods of layout, clamping, and tool sharpening will also be covered.
Description: Want to learn the basics of wood turning or refresh your skills from Jr. High shop class? This class covers the basics, including shop and lathe safety, tool identification and selection, mounting wood to the lathe and wood selection. In the first half of the class students will turn the handle for a 1/4" turning tool to take home. In the second half they will work on a small project determined by the instructor.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
$1250.00 (Includes all Materials)            . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) In this class not only will we build this beautiful coffee table inspired by Greene and Greene, Stickley and a little bit of Krenov, but we will learn many table construction techniques. Reading wood grain, Mortise & tenon, shaping wood, bread board ends, drawer construction, fitting the drawer, as well as many of the Greene and Greene details such as square ebony…
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!

Description: Turned wooden bowls can make your dining experience truely memorable or create a display piece to show off your talent. This class will focus on using basic turning tools and techniques to create these wooden bowls. Wood selection and mounting for grain orientation to get the most out of each piece will be discussed along with selection of proper tools. Skills learned in this class will prepare students for our Fingernail Bowl Gouge Class.

The space behind a door is a storage spot that’s often overlooked. Build a set of shallow shelves and mount it to the wall behind your laundry room door. The materials are inexpensive. Measure the distance between the door hinge and the wall and subtract an inch. This is the maximum depth of the shelves. We used 1x4s for the sides, top and shelves. Screw the sides to the top. Then screw three 1×2 hanging strips to the sides: one top and bottom and one centered. Nail metal shelf standards to the sides. Complete the shelves by nailing a 1×2 trim piece to the sides and top. The 1×2 dresses up the shelf unit and keeps the shelves from falling off the shelf clips.


Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a rule?
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