The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.

Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.


Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a rule?
Description: Have you toyed with the idea of building your own cabinets for the kitchen, or the garage? And, as all woodworkers realize, the shop never has enough storage? If this synopsis connects with you, then Woodcraft's new Cabinet Making Series may fill the bill for you. The Cabinet Making Series is designed to maintain continuity by combining all the components of basic cabinetry in 17 hours (three sessions) of classroom and ptractical hands on instruction. Students will learn bisc fundamentals in how to choose and prepare stock to construct Base Units, Upper Wall Units, Drawers and Raised Panel Doors. Stock preparation will be accomplished utilizing the jointer, planer, electric miter saw, tablesaw and router table. Cabinet carcasses will be assembled using standard techniques and face frames will be assembled and attached using the Kreg Pocket Hole System. So, come on out, learn the techniques for making your own cabinets from the planning stage to ta finished product complete with drawers and doors.
Have you got an old whiskey barrel at home that you haven’t used for ages? If yes, this project is for you. You can make a really beautiful coffee table from that old whiskey barrel in a few easy steps. Apart from a coffee table, whiskey barrels can also be used to build several other furniture items. But that is a talk for later. Here, we will discuss how to make a coffee table from a whiskey barrel.
Description: In this class period furniture maker Ray Journigan will show you why there were so many different types of planes and what each one was used for. Through demonstrations, he will show you why the most expensive plane is NOT necessary to get a perfect surface. Watch his procedure of making rough lumber turn into glass smooth, finish ready surfaces in just minutes, no sanding necessary! Ever wonder what to look for in a flea marker plane? How to sharpen it for razor thin shavings? How to set it up properly? What makes one plane better than another? Come see why every shop needs a good hand plane no matter what style furniture you make. If you are thinking about incorporating hand tools into your work, take this class before you buy your first hand plane.

Another wooden item that I love very much is a beautiful mobile holder. You can see one in the image below. These things are not only beautiful, but they can comfortably hold any sized mobile and ensure proper safety. Another amazing thing is that they can be built in many shapes and sizes, as and how you need it. You can see some more examples at the source below
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
Isn’t this amazing that instead of having to throw that old furniture piece away, you can now reuse it to build something even more beautiful? If you do not like this particular idea, there are many other re-purposeful furniture items you can build from an old dresser. Just search the internet for other DIY project ideas. Here is a link to the video tutorial that explains the same procedure in a more practical manner that you can easily follow through.

Description: In this class period furniture maker Ray Journigan will show you why there were so many different types of planes and what each one was used for. Through demonstrations, he will show you why the most expensive plane is NOT necessary to get a perfect surface. Watch his procedure of making rough lumber turn into glass smooth, finish ready surfaces in just minutes, no sanding necessary! Ever wonder what to look for in a flea marker plane? How to sharpen it for razor thin shavings? How to set it up properly? What makes one plane better than another? Come see why every shop needs a good hand plane no matter what style furniture you make. If you are thinking about incorporating hand tools into your work, take this class before you buy your first hand plane.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
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