$50 - $100Alaska Dream HouseBathroomBedroomChildren's and Kid's Room Furniture and Toy PlansCraftroomDesk, Desk Systems and Project Table Plansdining roomentry wayFarmhouse Style Furniture PlansIndustrial Style Furniture PlansKids and Toysliving roomModern Style Furniture PlansNursery and BabyofficeRustic Furniture Plansstorage and organizationTeensIntermediateSide and End Table PlansBuffet, Sideboard and Credenza PlansCabinet PlansNightstands
$875.00 (Includes all Materials)          . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) Good joinery is key to making fine furniture that will last for generations. Many of us are intimidated by the complexity of these joints. In this class we hope to de-mystify and simplify the joinery process. We will learn western and eastern joinery and their applications, including dovetails, half-blind dovetails, sliding dovetails, mortise-and-tenons, angled mortise-and-tenons, lap joints, bridle joints, miter joints, scarf joints,…
Isn’t this amazing that instead of having to throw that old furniture piece away, you can now reuse it to build something even more beautiful? If you do not like this particular idea, there are many other re-purposeful furniture items you can build from an old dresser. Just search the internet for other DIY project ideas. Here is a link to the video tutorial that explains the same procedure in a more practical manner that you can easily follow through.

Really nice projects but I wish they didn’t use machines every every single step not everyone has a full commercial shop with huge commercial sized machines that cost thousands of dollars in their house. They need to start focusing on hand tools what what the average person has in their house like table saw and drills and stuff like that not everyone has a massive router table with specialty fence and machine or a commercial band saw or massive commercial table saw or huge joiners and thickness planners. It’s not prectical for most people. The steps are short too like Ok do this whole section on this commercial machine that not average woodworker owns and only someone with a commercial company would even have access to but those people aren’t buying this book because they know how to do these things already they don’t need a book telling them how to do what the legit do as a career. The people buying this book are normal people trying to do this as a hobby for fun at home. So cater to them don’t take a short cut because it’s easy for you to tell someone to do something you can do in two seconds but those people have to somehow figure out how to do this one their own in a way not shown in the book because they don’t have the machines you do. It’s Being lazy and writing a book that’s almost completely useless to someone trying to make these projects. But if I did own all these machines and has all that space and money and materials it’s a good book.


Description: Want to learn the basics of wood turning or refresh your skills from Jr. High shop class? This class covers the basics, including shop and lathe safety, tool identification and selection, mounting wood to the lathe and wood selection. In the first half of the class students will turn the handle for a 1/4" turning tool to take home. In the second half they will work on a small project determined by the instructor.

With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.
$1595.00 (Includes all Materials)                    . $500.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) The focus of this class will be making a sculpted rocking chair. We will explore the joinery, bent lamination, sculpting, balance and comfort that make this chair so special. This is an advanced class and requires the student to have knowledge and experience with basic hand tools like rasps, gouges, spokeshaves and block planes. We will also use…
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
The use of hand tools is often the favorite part of a woodworkers project; hand tools are quiet and demand a level of concentration that makes one forget about everything else. Immerse yourself in this one-day hand tools intensive taught by master craftsman Glen Guarino of Guarino Furniture Designs. Students will start out with a block of wood from...
The video explains the step by step process of making a nice wooden phone stand from scratch. My first wooden holder was not the best one, but it was good enough to motivate me to make more. I now possess 10 mobile wooden stands in different shapes and styles. And if I can make this, you too can make one yourself. Search the internet for more mobile holder ideas and start making one now.

Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.

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