Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a rule?

Our staff of instructors possess a wide variety of skills and interests but an intense passion for the subject they are teaching is common to them all. Whether it is a woodcarving class with Will Neptune, a furniture making class with the school’s director, Bob Van Dyke, or a class on inlay and bandings with Steve Latta, students are assured of thoroughly learning the skills in a relaxed hands-on atmosphere.
Description: This is a more in depth class about bench planes than above. In this class, let period furniture maker Ray Journigan show you how to make using a bench plane your new favorite go to tool. Lean what makes one plane better than another? Then Ray demonstrates the steps of flattening a wide board using hand planes followed by each student having the opportunity to surface a board to "finish ready" without any sanding using their hand planes. In this class we take the plane apart and explain all the adjustments to properly tune up your hand plane. Then block planes are discussed showing their importance in furniture work. Next, for those REALLY interested in learning how different types of handplanes were used, Ray will show and demonstrate the use of specialty planes such as Rabbit planes, Shoulder planes, Dado planes, Dovetail planes, Scraper planes, and molding planes. Lastly we turn our attention to sharpening to a razor edge. Student leave with an eye opening experience having learned thru practice, the joy and ease of using hand planes.
Some tools required for this project are hole saw, drilling machine, pencil, tape measure, clamps, etc. This tutorial explains every step properly with images so that anyone can make a wooden sofa sleeve easily. Those, who prefer a video tutorial, can visit the below link to a YouTube video that illustrates the process of building a DIY Sofa Sleeve Cupholder.

Description: Learn to make a cutting board with various species of wood. You will prepare, glue, cut on a band saw, rout, and finally apply a food-safe finish. This process will result in a stunning cutting board! You will learn how to use a router and one of our templates to make a fun shape or choose to keep a traditional rectangular shape. Some sanding and finishing will need to be completed at home.

Nightstand table plans have everything you need to create a bedside table to keep every needy thing at reach at night time. This Nigh Stand plan is quite different in design from the most of the other plans. This stand has not only the three regular drawers but also having a hidden drawer that uses a secret locking mechanism to keep contents securely.
In this 5-day intensive you'll get hands-on training with essential hand tools--back saws, chisels, and planes--while making a classic hardwood mallet with simple and elegant joinery. You'll also learn how to keep your tools sharp and well-tuned. This class provides a solid foundation of skills and techniques for both small projects and more advanced...
With a variety of styles covering every skill level, the Great Book of Woodworking Projects has something for everyone. Whether you want a challenging project that will beautify your home, such as a stunning Stickley chest of drawers, or you need a quick and easy project for a gift, such as a keepsake box or picture frame, you will find plans that will take a few hours or a weekend to complete.

Description: If you have taken Carving 101 and/or Chip Carving classes and want to work on basic techniques and interesting new patterns to develop your skills, this workshop is for you! Jim will help you refresh basic techniques and sharpen your skills through discussion and demonstration. He will share new patterns and refine your carving technique in a hands on practice clinic. Jim will also provide sharpening instruction to keep your tools cutting clean chips every time.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
Making an art or a design on a wooden piece is a hectic task and requires good art skills. But there is another much easier way to carve a beautiful art on any wood surface. For this, you will need the image or graphic that you want to transfer, a piece of wood, freezer paper, etc. I, myself have made several such designs. At the source below, you can find a step by step guide for transferring a graphic image to the wood.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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