Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.
There’s a lot of space above the shelf in most closets. Even though it’s a little hard to reach, it’s a great place to store seldom-used items. Make use of this wasted space by adding a second shelf above the existing one. Buy enough closet shelving material to match the length of the existing shelf plus enough for two end supports and middle supports over each bracket. Twelve-inch-wide shelving is available in various lengths and finishes at home centers and lumberyards.
For a fun and comprehensive learning experience, take an online woodworking class in the WWGOA Academy. You’ll learn in-depth woodworking how-to, get bonus material, and enjoy custom benefits for class participants. You’ll never lose access to your Class; no strings attached! Check back often – as we’re adding new online woodworking classes regularly.
$875.00 (Includes all Materials)          . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) Good joinery is key to making fine furniture that will last for generations. Many of us are intimidated by the complexity of these joints. In this class we hope to de-mystify and simplify the joinery process. We will learn western and eastern joinery and their applications, including dovetails, half-blind dovetails, sliding dovetails, mortise-and-tenons, angled mortise-and-tenons, lap joints, bridle joints, miter joints, scarf joints,…
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.

The best thing about the toy chest is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can also modify your kid’s toy chest in any way you want or build in a different design or color different from the one pictured above. You can try some other designs for your plan in the below-mentioned link.
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