Description: Come spend some time with us and make a small (about sixteen inch tall) three legged stool. A perfect size to use as a foot stool or as a fire side stool. This class will teach a multitude of turning skills, from face plate and spindle turning to duplicating and assembly. Finishing options will also be discussed. The skills and knowledge learned can be used to make taller stools and may also be used for other turned furniture projects. Turning tools will be provided but you may bring your own.
Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!
Relax and enjoy your outdoor space with this smart patio combo consisting of a sofa and chair. You can adjust the size completely to make it fit perfectly onto your patio or deck, and both the sofa and chair have arms that double as trays for al fresco dining. And you can make your own cushions to fit, or use shop-bought ones and add your own ties, if necessary.
Description: One of the first hand held power tools every novice wood worker should have in their arsenal is the router. With an assortment of sharp cutter bits, the router will become one of the most used small power tools in the shop. Although highly versatile, the router can be very intimidating; due to its size and the speed and torque it develops. In the Router 101 class, students will learn how to choose a router, the types of bases used with the router, and the care and feeding (maintenance) of the router. Students will also learn about the categories of router bits, the components used to identify them, what goes into the making of a router bit, and what to look for in making a choice of which bit best meets their needs. So come on out, bring your router and bits if you have them and learn basic routing techniques and tips and tricks to enhance your routing skills.
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.

Building a wine rack is usually a very common beginner's woodworking plan. Creating a wine rack is an easy plan that can most of the time be completed in a day or half, depending on how large and detailed you would like it to be. And the better news is that this free wine rack plan will let you build you a great looking wine rack for much less than it would cost.

Description: With endless possibilities, your biggest challenge will be deciding what you can do next with your scroll saw. This tool opens up the worlds of intarsia, fretwork, marquetry, and inlay work, just to begin! Learn blade selection, tensioning, and the pros and cons of fixed speed versus various speed saws while making several take-home projects.

Designed for beginners with little to no woodworking experience, this five-session class covers wood physics, shop safety and etiquette, an introduction to joinery concepts, and hands-on experience with the most commonly used woodworking machines. The project for this class is a small side table featuring half-laps, bridle joints, and a round top....


Description: In this class, Ray explains through demonstration the proper use, the making of all the joints used in 18th century furniture construction. The different types of dovetails, mortise and tenons, bridle joints, and others. While machine alternative methods will be discussed our focus will be on the use of hand tools to cut each joint. After watching the procedure demonstrated each student will be coached through their first attempt at each joint using their own hand tools. Learn how to properly and accurately layout and cut the perfect fitting joint! The best part is that these methods can be used on any style of furniture you wish to make ensuring they will last well over 200 years!
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
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