Making an art or a design on a wooden piece is a hectic task and requires good art skills. But there is another much easier way to carve a beautiful art on any wood surface. For this, you will need the image or graphic that you want to transfer, a piece of wood, freezer paper, etc. I, myself have made several such designs. At the source below, you can find a step by step guide for transferring a graphic image to the wood.
Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.
Using shelving in your room or kitchen is a great way to arrange and de-clutter space… I know, such ground-breaking term it is. Do not write me off yet, I just want to show you how you can build some clean floating corner shelving that appears to have no brackets. You can create them at no cost, and the hardest part of the plan is figuring out what you are going to put on these shelves when you are finished.
Description: The intent of this class is to learn the basic skills and underlying principles used to construct an end grain board. This can be a cutting board, cheese board, butcher block, etc. The class is in three sessions because there are two overnight glue ups required. Day 1 we will discuss why to construct something end grain; how to prevent cracking; types of wood to use (and not use); required tools and their safe use; how to layout the board; performing the initial preparation of the stock and first glue up. Day 2 consists of cleaning the board up, cutting and arranging it into the desired final pattern, and the second glue up. Day 3 will be the final clean up; trimming; final sanding; edge routing/sanding; a discussion on finishes and how to maintain the board.
Wall-mounted or placed on a table or countertop, this handsome display cabinet is the perfect way to share any collection while keeping it clean and protected at the same time. Featuring tempered glass doors and three shelves, the cabinet’s design calls for all straight cuts and straightforward construction techniques (simple cut-outs give the effect of
If you bought this superb polished table in a store, it would cost you a fortune, but our detailed instructions will help you make one for less than $100. And it looks like highly polished stone, but no-one would know it’s actually made from concrete with a wooden base. Also, you can embellish the top with leaf prints, like the table shown here, or personalize it with glass or mosaic tiles or imprints of seashells.
The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.
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