Description: The intent of this class is to learn the basic skills and underlying principles used to construct an end grain board. This can be a cutting board, cheese board, butcher block, etc. The class is in three sessions because there are two overnight glue ups required. Day 1 we will discuss why to construct something end grain; how to prevent cracking; types of wood to use (and not use); required tools and their safe use; how to layout the board; performing the initial preparation of the stock and first glue up. Day 2 consists of cleaning the board up, cutting and arranging it into the desired final pattern, and the second glue up. Day 3 will be the final clean up; trimming; final sanding; edge routing/sanding; a discussion on finishes and how to maintain the board.
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
$1555.00 (Includes all Materials)                        . $500.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) This is perhaps the most difficult class we offer at our school. This class is not for the faint hearted. This chair will challenge every area of your woodworking skill. We will be dealing with angles, proportion, chair design, choosing wood grain, sculpting of the crest rail using an angle grinder, inlay techniques for the back…
Description: In this class you will learn, through demonstrations and exercises, the fundamentals of carving that will provide a solid foundation for all types of carving. Learn about carving materials and tools, how to sharpen and get the most out of each tool, how to read and carve in relation to wood grain, how to set up a work station, and about different styles of carving. Together we'll execute, beads, rosettes, volutes, "C" scroll, and more. You'll leave with the understanding and confidence to grow and explore with this new found skill!
Another wooden item that I love very much is a beautiful mobile holder. You can see one in the image below. These things are not only beautiful, but they can comfortably hold any sized mobile and ensure proper safety. Another amazing thing is that they can be built in many shapes and sizes, as and how you need it. You can see some more examples at the source below

Looking to jump right into the world of fine woodworking? Is your goal is to continue creating projects long after attending one of our workshops? Then Introduction to Furniture Making is for you! Throughout this 16 hour intensive workshop (split over 4 or 6 sessions), students will build a solid foundation for their new venture into woodworking....


Description: Sharp tools make all aspects of woodworking more enjoyable. But keeping them sharp has been a point of frustration that has steered many away from using them. This class will teach the techniques needed to maintain a sharp edge on your flat bench tools. In this class, all methods of sharpening will be discussed i.e. water stones, oil stones, wet/dry sandpaper, diamond stones and motorized discs. The use of honing compounds and strops will also be discussed. Come out and gain the skill and confidence needed to put a razor edge on all your bench tools.
The space behind a door is a storage spot that’s often overlooked. Build a set of shallow shelves and mount it to the wall behind your laundry room door. The materials are inexpensive. Measure the distance between the door hinge and the wall and subtract an inch. This is the maximum depth of the shelves. We used 1x4s for the sides, top and shelves. Screw the sides to the top. Then screw three 1×2 hanging strips to the sides: one top and bottom and one centered. Nail metal shelf standards to the sides. Complete the shelves by nailing a 1×2 trim piece to the sides and top. The 1×2 dresses up the shelf unit and keeps the shelves from falling off the shelf clips.
A woodworker's Workbench is a special type of bench designed to hold your work when you are working on a wood project. The main purpose of this table is to keep the woodwork steady and to prevent it from moving. Follow the tutorial below to build yourself a nice workbench suitable for your specific woodworking projects. Make sure to modify the table to fit your specific requirements.
The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.
There’s a lot of space above the shelf in most closets. Even though it’s a little hard to reach, it’s a great place to store seldom-used items. Make use of this wasted space by adding a second shelf above the existing one. Buy enough closet shelving material to match the length of the existing shelf plus enough for two end supports and middle supports over each bracket. Twelve-inch-wide shelving is available in various lengths and finishes at home centers and lumberyards.

A super simple iPad Dock/stand made out of a single block of wood features an angled groove which gets to support the tablet device and a cut in a hole to revise access to the home button of your iPad. It’s possible to drill an access channel in the stand through which you can run a charging cable, although this mini stripped back iPad stand may have very limited functions.
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