When you are gathering inspiration for barn door Plan, be sure to note the cost of the tools used in the plan. Barn door tools can often cost more than your actual door! But, there are many clever and affordable do it yourself tools options in the tutorials mentioned below! Let us explore some DIY Barn Door Tutorials. Just click on the blue text below and check some amazing fun Barn doors. They might be different from the one shown in above picture.

Description: Come spend some time with us and make a small (about sixteen inch tall) three legged stool. A perfect size to use as a foot stool or as a fire side stool. This class will teach a multitude of turning skills, from face plate and spindle turning to duplicating and assembly. Finishing options will also be discussed. The skills and knowledge learned can be used to make taller stools and may also be used for other turned furniture projects. Turning tools will be provided but you may bring your own.


Description: The bandsaw is one of your most versatile power tools, and this class will show you how to safely get the most out of it. Steve will show you how to set up your bandsaw for consistent accuracy and teach you proper blade selection. Learn how to perform straight cuts, curves, and how to rough saw cabriole lets. You'll also learn the secrets of resawing: a technique that can save you money and add uniqueness to your projects
And the fact is that you can make your own patio chair with several old but still good pallets. Here we are providing a tutorial that everybody can follow easily – it is very well-written and also self-explanatory, which is great for those who are a beginner at woodworking and have never completed a DIY project before. As you don’t need to be a professional woodworker or a handyman to complete this project, so it is not a difficult task – all you need is a bit of determination!​
Description: A foot stool is a great way to gain skills with hand tools. This useful piece of furniture can be used to rest the feet after a long day or as a sitting stool for that last arriving guest. In this class, after mastering mortise and tenons by hand, Ray will show you how to layout, cut, and shape Queen Anne cabriole legs without the need of a lathe. You may choose to carve ball & claw feet if you have already taken that class! Then, using rasp, spokeshaves, and scrapers, he will show you how to refine the curved shapes. For the more ambitious, Ray will demonstrate carving the applied scalloped shells that can be applied to the aprons and also how to execute the shell on the knees carved in the solid. You don't want to miss this one! It will take your woodworking to the next level! Now you will be ready to tackle the upcoming Queen Anne Side Chair! Tool List: You are encouraged to bring your general woodworking tools along with the following: For the Stool: 5/16" Mortise Chisel 1⁄4", 1⁄2", 3⁄4", 1" bench Chisels (If you have them) Mallet 6" or larger Rule Combination Square Tenon or Dovetail saw #49 or 50 Nicholson rasp or equalivant 10" Med cut cabinet file 8" Smooth cut wood file Spokeshave Square card scraper Smooth plane Block Plane Shoulder Plane Compass Carving parts: (optional): You are encouraged to bring your carving roll with chisels to include the following: 15/6mm v tool 7/14mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 2/12mm gouge 8/3mm gouge 2/30mm gouge 8/7mm gouge 5/8mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/10mm gouge 5/12mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/13mm gouge 5/25mm gouge 25/10mm Backbend gouge 7/6mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 7/10mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing)
We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
Description: Without a doubt, the tablesaw is the most important power tool in the shop. Safely ripping stock to width, accurately cutting parts to length, cutting angles, bevels and making tenons and tapers are just a few of the tasks that an accurately set up tablesaw excels at. Understanding how the saw works is one of the goals of this new class and basic common sense safety will be covered thoroughly. We will begin with techniques to make safe and specialized cuts such as making accurate tenons and miters. Saw blade selection, dado blades and some of the commercially available accessories will be discussed. We will also demonstrate some basic but important shop made jigs. While this class will mostly be dom only, students will have the opportunity to do some cutting on the saw in order to make sure that each participant understands the techniques being shown.
Description: Have you ever gone to one of those expensive framing shops and been taken back by the cost of a picture frame? Here is the opportunity to learn how to make your own frames and save money. The Picture Framing class will show you the basics for measuring and making your own picture frames. You will be shown how to use woodworking joinery that can be incorporated in your framing projects which are not only functional, but decorative as well. You will use the jointer and table saw to square stock, the table saw and the electric miter saw to cut mitered corners, and the router table to create assorted decorative profiles for your frames. Students will make the components for an 8" X 10" picture frame.
From the image above it seems that you do not require a big tutorial to help you to build this candle holder. All you need is a wood panel, a hook and some nails/screws and do exactly what you see in the picture. Attach the hook to the wood panel using two screws and then, attach the panel to the wall using more nails or screws. That’s it. I hope this gets the job done.

The best thing about the toy chest is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can also modify your kid’s toy chest in any way you want or build in a different design or color different from the one pictured above. You can try some other designs for your plan in the below-mentioned link.

×