Description: In this class you will learn, through demonstrations and exercises, the fundamentals of carving that will provide a solid foundation for all types of carving. Learn about carving materials and tools, how to sharpen and get the most out of each tool, how to read and carve in relation to wood grain, how to set up a work station, and about different styles of carving. Together we'll execute, beads, rosettes, volutes, "C" scroll, and more. You'll leave with the understanding and confidence to grow and explore with this new found skill!
Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
Here, I am writing about another DIY project that involves the use of an old furniture piece. I think that the idea of reusing and recycling old furniture has got to me. Anyways, I am starting to love it. This project involves using an old door to build a beautiful multi picture frame, as you can see in the image below. This frame looks really wonderful and can be used to hold many pictures at a time.
Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.

Can you believe that this amazing wine rack the image below has been built using old wood pallets? Perhaps you can. Isn’t it wonderful that your old wood pallets can be reused to build something so beautiful and useful? I am not a drinker but I liked the idea so much that I just couldn’t resist making myself one. Although later I gifted it to my parents, who totally loved it.
As soon as I came across this tutorial, I didn’t wait any longer to start building one. Some of the items you need for this project are hardwood plywood, saw, glue, nails, drilling machine, etc. The video is very easy to follow for anyone with basic woodworking knowledge and experience. The first source link also includes a step by step procedure in plain English for those, who are not comfortable enough with the video tutorial.
This is definitely going to be one of the easiest woodworking projects you’ll be reading about today. So why not just get started? The tutorial link is given below. Just do exactly what they are saying in the tutorial and you will end up making a beautiful wooden doormat just like the one in the image above. They are using pine wood to build this doormat. You can choose any wood material that best suits your budget.
$400.00 (Includes all Materials)               . $100.00 Deposit ( Balance due 30 days before class) Using inlay to embellish your projects can be very rewarding. It's a way to take your work to the next level, to set yourself apart from others. In this intensive two day class we will cover the following topics. 1. Tools, including the jeweler's fretsaw, carving tools, shop made vises, and a vise that I personally designed and use. 2.…
Description: Spend a weekend with Woodcraft and leave with a traditional Adirondack chair. This course is designed for the entry to intermediate level woodworker who would like to improve their furniture building skills. You will work with both power and hand tools to cut, drill, sand and assemble this classic chair. Instructions, drawings, cypress wood and fasteners are included in the tuition.
$875.00 (Includes all Materials)         . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) We have an exceptional opportunity offering a class taught by David A Wade, who had worked along side Sam Maloof for over 25 years. David sculpted many of Sam’s creations from the iconic sculpted rocking chair to the sculpted table. Many refer to sculpted Maloof pieces as “sensuous” and are drawn to touch his works. Every woodworker desiring to enhance their craft will benefit…
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
This seven-session workshop builds on skills learned during SXW 680 or SXW 686. Students learn additional foundation skills to build wood furniture and related objects incorporating wood physics and joinery concepts. Traditional hand tools including block planes, cabinet scrapers, and spokeshaves are introduced as well as how to safely operate woodworking...
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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