$1555.00 (Includes all Materials)                        . $500.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) This is perhaps the most difficult class we offer at our school. This class is not for the faint hearted. This chair will challenge every area of your woodworking skill. We will be dealing with angles, proportion, chair design, choosing wood grain, sculpting of the crest rail using an angle grinder, inlay techniques for the back…
Some tools required for this project are hole saw, drilling machine, pencil, tape measure, clamps, etc. This tutorial explains every step properly with images so that anyone can make a wooden sofa sleeve easily. Those, who prefer a video tutorial, can visit the below link to a YouTube video that illustrates the process of building a DIY Sofa Sleeve Cupholder.
And the fact is that you can make your own patio chair with several old but still good pallets. Here we are providing a tutorial that everybody can follow easily – it is very well-written and also self-explanatory, which is great for those who are a beginner at woodworking and have never completed a DIY project before. As you don’t need to be a professional woodworker or a handyman to complete this project, so it is not a difficult task – all you need is a bit of determination!​

$360.00 (Includes all Materials except the Plane) $100.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) In this two day class we will reveal some of the secrets to tuning up a Japanese Hand Plane (Kanna) We will start with conditioning the Body of the Plane (DAI) to stabilize movement. Proper sharpening and grinding of the blade and chip breaker will be discussed and demonstrated. Custom fitting the blade to the Dai and conditioning the sole. We will also demystified the…
We have a small dining room area in our farmhouse that is separate from the living room and kitchen. The area is much smaller in space than our last house. I was little confused that our typical rectangular farmhouse table was not going to cut it. So, I walked in I came to know that we needed to build a round dining table. So, I searched for a plan design idea and build a very own round farmhouse dining table. I was an amazing DIY plan, I just love it!
If you bought this superb polished table in a store, it would cost you a fortune, but our detailed instructions will help you make one for less than $100. And it looks like highly polished stone, but no-one would know it’s actually made from concrete with a wooden base. Also, you can embellish the top with leaf prints, like the table shown here, or personalize it with glass or mosaic tiles or imprints of seashells.
Another awesome thing about this coffee table is that it is also has a storage unit. So you can store drinks, and other stuff in the half barrel of your table and then close or open it whenever you need. Pete has also constructed a video for this tutorial for which you can find the link below. It illustrates the same process in a video guide that shows you the exact process to be followed while building this whiskey barrel coffee table.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
Description: Do you and your significant other want to le3arn basic wood working skills and have fun creating a one of a kind project together? We will provide the food, soft drinks, and materials. You only need to show up and be ready to make some saw dust. Projects will vary from month to month and will consist of small projects such as pens, bottle stoppers/openers, pepper grinders, etc.

Description: Come explore the world of chip carving! Geometric and free form designs created with a cutting knife and stab knife provide tremendous opportunities for artistic expression based on generations of tradition. This hands-on class will cover carving techniques, traditional as well as free form designs, layout and knife sharpening methods. Tools required: Chip carving cutting knife and stab knife, mechanical pencil with .5mm lead, eraser, T-square, and draftsman's compass. Recommended reading: The Complete Guide to Chip Carving by Wayne Barton.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Description: This is a more in depth class about bench planes than above. In this class, let period furniture maker Ray Journigan show you how to make using a bench plane your new favorite go to tool. Lean what makes one plane better than another? Then Ray demonstrates the steps of flattening a wide board using hand planes followed by each student having the opportunity to surface a board to "finish ready" without any sanding using their hand planes. In this class we take the plane apart and explain all the adjustments to properly tune up your hand plane. Then block planes are discussed showing their importance in furniture work. Next, for those REALLY interested in learning how different types of handplanes were used, Ray will show and demonstrate the use of specialty planes such as Rabbit planes, Shoulder planes, Dado planes, Dovetail planes, Scraper planes, and molding planes. Lastly we turn our attention to sharpening to a razor edge. Student leave with an eye opening experience having learned thru practice, the joy and ease of using hand planes.
There’s something so satisfying about creating something out of nothing. That’s why we think woodworking is one of the greatest hobbies out there. You can create your very own functional pieces and add your own flare to it, feeling accomplished and proud every time you lay your eyes on your project. Plus, it’s a great way to stay under budget when decorating your home or giving beautiful gifts. In the long run, the price of lumber and tools is far less than the price of buying a piece new that would be simple to build at home.
The source above is not exactly a tutorial, but it gives you a basic idea of how the author built a Quirky Pallet Art to enhance the look of their old house. You can also find another tutorial at the link below. It shares a step by step procedure for making a wooden pallet sign. The final product is not exactly the same as the one above, but the basic idea is the same.
Really nice projects but I wish they didn’t use machines every every single step not everyone has a full commercial shop with huge commercial sized machines that cost thousands of dollars in their house. They need to start focusing on hand tools what what the average person has in their house like table saw and drills and stuff like that not everyone has a massive router table with specialty fence and machine or a commercial band saw or massive commercial table saw or huge joiners and thickness planners. It’s not prectical for most people. The steps are short too like Ok do this whole section on this commercial machine that not average woodworker owns and only someone with a commercial company would even have access to but those people aren’t buying this book because they know how to do these things already they don’t need a book telling them how to do what the legit do as a career. The people buying this book are normal people trying to do this as a hobby for fun at home. So cater to them don’t take a short cut because it’s easy for you to tell someone to do something you can do in two seconds but those people have to somehow figure out how to do this one their own in a way not shown in the book because they don’t have the machines you do. It’s Being lazy and writing a book that’s almost completely useless to someone trying to make these projects. But if I did own all these machines and has all that space and money and materials it’s a good book.
Learn the basics of woodworking with simple hands-on projects to build your confidence and skills. Each lesson in this class explores an area of woodworking that will form the building blocks of all future woodworking projects you undertake. Keeping the average DIY'er in mind, this entire class is conducted using basic handheld power tools, with no fancy fixed tools like table saws, lathes, planers, or drill presses.
$1250.00 (Includes all Materials)            . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) In this class not only will we build this beautiful coffee table inspired by Greene and Greene, Stickley and a little bit of Krenov, but we will learn many table construction techniques. Reading wood grain, Mortise & tenon, shaping wood, bread board ends, drawer construction, fitting the drawer, as well as many of the Greene and Greene details such as square ebony…
Description: Sharp tools make all aspects of woodworking more enjoyable. But keeping them sharp has been a point of frustration that has steered many away from using them. This class will teach the techniques needed to maintain a sharp edge on your flat bench tools. In this class, all methods of sharpening will be discussed i.e. water stones, oil stones, wet/dry sandpaper, diamond stones and motorized discs. The use of honing compounds and strops will also be discussed. Come out and gain the skill and confidence needed to put a razor edge on all your bench tools.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
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With a variety of styles covering every skill level, the Great Book of Woodworking Projects has something for everyone. Whether you want a challenging project that will beautify your home, such as a stunning Stickley chest of drawers, or you need a quick and easy project for a gift, such as a keepsake box or picture frame, you will find plans that will take a few hours or a weekend to complete.
From the image above it seems that you do not require a big tutorial to help you to build this candle holder. All you need is a wood panel, a hook and some nails/screws and do exactly what you see in the picture. Attach the hook to the wood panel using two screws and then, attach the panel to the wall using more nails or screws. That’s it. I hope this gets the job done.

Have you got an old whiskey barrel at home that you haven’t used for ages? If yes, this project is for you. You can make a really beautiful coffee table from that old whiskey barrel in a few easy steps. Apart from a coffee table, whiskey barrels can also be used to build several other furniture items. But that is a talk for later. Here, we will discuss how to make a coffee table from a whiskey barrel.


Description: Do you like playing bean bag toss but don't have your own set of boards? Buying a custom set can be expensive. Come take our Bean Bag Toss Game Board Class and we will show you how to make your own set of boards that you can take home and paint however you like. The class will also illustrate how a Kreg Pocket Screw Jig can build a variety of strong joints quickly. Each student will make a set of boards that lock together with storage to hold your bean bags.
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
Description: If you have taken Carving 101 and/or Chip Carving classes and want to work on basic techniques and interesting new patterns to develop your skills, this workshop is for you! Jim will help you refresh basic techniques and sharpen your skills through discussion and demonstration. He will share new patterns and refine your carving technique in a hands on practice clinic. Jim will also provide sharpening instruction to keep your tools cutting clean chips every time.
Description: Ok you've been through Fundamentals Level 1, now let Bret take you one step further with your favorite hobby. During this class you will add to your basic skills by constructing a beautiful Shaker style plant stand. Solid wood table top and tapered legs will be incorporated into this project, teaching you skills needed for furniture making.
A few days back, I was searching for some cool DIY plans. So, I got to work and ended up coming up with some easy to follow project and an awesome new ice chest cooler to have out on the deck! It was going to be perfect for summer hangouts and barbecues. It was a fun and practical plan to work on and I know you will have fun tackling select a design from this plan and start building your own. Enjoy learning how you can build a rustic cooler also sing the video tutorial and source tutorial plan!
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