Our staff of instructors possess a wide variety of skills and interests but an intense passion for the subject they are teaching is common to them all. Whether it is a woodcarving class with Will Neptune, a furniture making class with the school’s director, Bob Van Dyke, or a class on inlay and bandings with Steve Latta, students are assured of thoroughly learning the skills in a relaxed hands-on atmosphere.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.

Free next Tuesday evening? The Minneapolis store is offering a class on panel door construction August 1, from 5:00 to 9:00 pm.  You'll learn everything you need to know about this fundamental cabinetmaker's skill to make standard and arched top raised panel doors. August 5 at the Denver store, Cindy Drozda will offer instruction in the techniques she uses to produce her signature style lidded containers (see "Yemaya," above).  This is a great opportunity to learn from a master wood turner who has elevated the craft to the level of fine art.  Students will work on their own projects and most will take home a completed container. Also on August 5, the Phoenix store is offering an advanced turning class.  If you are an intermediate-level wood turner, this would be an excellent opportunity to sharpen your skills and learn techniques that go beyond the basics.


Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
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