Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.
Have you got an old whiskey barrel at home that you haven’t used for ages? If yes, this project is for you. You can make a really beautiful coffee table from that old whiskey barrel in a few easy steps. Apart from a coffee table, whiskey barrels can also be used to build several other furniture items. But that is a talk for later. Here, we will discuss how to make a coffee table from a whiskey barrel.

Description: In this workshop, period furniture maker Ray Journigan will explain what you will need to start adding carvings to you furniture. It all starts with the proper set up at the workbench. Ray explains the importance of good lighting. Watch Ray as he carves a scalloped shell to show the different body and hand Ray will also explain what is needed to keep those tools razor sharp. Face it, carving tools are expensive. Ray explains what makes a good carving chisel and which tools makes a good starter set. If you are new to the idea of carving, get all your questions answered here before you start buying those tools!
We have a small dining room area in our farmhouse that is separate from the living room and kitchen. The area is much smaller in space than our last house. I was little confused that our typical rectangular farmhouse table was not going to cut it. So, I walked in I came to know that we needed to build a round dining table. So, I searched for a plan design idea and build a very own round farmhouse dining table. I was an amazing DIY plan, I just love it!
Description: A foot stool is a great way to gain skills with hand tools. This useful piece of furniture can be used to rest the feet after a long day or as a sitting stool for that last arriving guest. In this class, after mastering mortise and tenons by hand, Ray will show you how to layout, cut, and shape Queen Anne cabriole legs without the need of a lathe. You may choose to carve ball & claw feet if you have already taken that class! Then, using rasp, spokeshaves, and scrapers, he will show you how to refine the curved shapes. For the more ambitious, Ray will demonstrate carving the applied scalloped shells that can be applied to the aprons and also how to execute the shell on the knees carved in the solid. You don't want to miss this one! It will take your woodworking to the next level! Now you will be ready to tackle the upcoming Queen Anne Side Chair! Tool List: You are encouraged to bring your general woodworking tools along with the following: For the Stool: 5/16" Mortise Chisel 1⁄4", 1⁄2", 3⁄4", 1" bench Chisels (If you have them) Mallet 6" or larger Rule Combination Square Tenon or Dovetail saw #49 or 50 Nicholson rasp or equalivant 10" Med cut cabinet file 8" Smooth cut wood file Spokeshave Square card scraper Smooth plane Block Plane Shoulder Plane Compass Carving parts: (optional): You are encouraged to bring your carving roll with chisels to include the following: 15/6mm v tool 7/14mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 2/12mm gouge 8/3mm gouge 2/30mm gouge 8/7mm gouge 5/8mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/10mm gouge 5/12mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/13mm gouge 5/25mm gouge 25/10mm Backbend gouge 7/6mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 7/10mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing)
And the fact is that you can make your own patio chair with several old but still good pallets. Here we are providing a tutorial that everybody can follow easily – it is very well-written and also self-explanatory, which is great for those who are a beginner at woodworking and have never completed a DIY project before. As you don’t need to be a professional woodworker or a handyman to complete this project, so it is not a difficult task – all you need is a bit of determination!​
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
Copyright 2018 by Cut The Wood. CutTheWood.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Additionally, CutTheWood.com participates in various other affiliate programs, and we sometimes get a commission through purchases made through our links.

Description: Come explore the world of chip carving! Geometric and free form designs created with a cutting knife and stab knife provide tremendous opportunities for artistic expression based on generations of tradition. This hands-on class will cover carving techniques, traditional as well as free form designs, layout and knife sharpening methods. Tools required: Chip carving cutting knife and stab knife, mechanical pencil with .5mm lead, eraser, T-square, and draftsman's compass. Recommended reading: The Complete Guide to Chip Carving by Wayne Barton.


The Nine-month Comprehensive is designed for aspiring professional furniture makers and dedicated amateurs who seek in-depth training at the highest standard of excellence. The hands-on, project-oriented format includes the full range of furniture making skills. Sequential projects take students from the fundamentals through the fine points of design and craftsmanship.
Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!
The space behind a door is a storage spot that’s often overlooked. Build a set of shallow shelves and mount it to the wall behind your laundry room door. The materials are inexpensive. Measure the distance between the door hinge and the wall and subtract an inch. This is the maximum depth of the shelves. We used 1x4s for the sides, top and shelves. Screw the sides to the top. Then screw three 1×2 hanging strips to the sides: one top and bottom and one centered. Nail metal shelf standards to the sides. Complete the shelves by nailing a 1×2 trim piece to the sides and top. The 1×2 dresses up the shelf unit and keeps the shelves from falling off the shelf clips.
Description: Without a doubt, the tablesaw is the most important power tool in the shop. Safely ripping stock to width, accurately cutting parts to length, cutting angles, bevels and making tenons and tapers are just a few of the tasks that an accurately set up tablesaw excels at. Understanding how the saw works is one of the goals of this new class and basic common sense safety will be covered thoroughly. We will begin with techniques to make safe and specialized cuts such as making accurate tenons and miters. Saw blade selection, dado blades and some of the commercially available accessories will be discussed. We will also demonstrate some basic but important shop made jigs. While this class will mostly be dom only, students will have the opportunity to do some cutting on the saw in order to make sure that each participant understands the techniques being shown.
Description: Have you ever gone to one of those expensive framing shops and been taken back by the cost of a picture frame? Here is the opportunity to learn how to make your own frames and save money. The Picture Framing class will show you the basics for measuring and making your own picture frames. You will be shown how to use woodworking joinery that can be incorporated in your framing projects which are not only functional, but decorative as well. You will use the jointer and table saw to square stock, the table saw and the electric miter saw to cut mitered corners, and the router table to create assorted decorative profiles for your frames. Students will make the components for an 8" X 10" picture frame.
If you bought this superb polished table in a store, it would cost you a fortune, but our detailed instructions will help you make one for less than $100. And it looks like highly polished stone, but no-one would know it’s actually made from concrete with a wooden base. Also, you can embellish the top with leaf prints, like the table shown here, or personalize it with glass or mosaic tiles or imprints of seashells.

These things may be tiny in size, but building one is not that easy. It takes some serious woodworking knowledge and skill to build a nice wooden mobile stand. When I first saw one online, I just couldn’t resist thinking of buying one. But when I saw the price, I was forced to rethink. Also, a woodwork lover like me cannot be contained with just one piece and I was not willing to spend on more than one. So instead I decided to build myself one. Yes, it took some doing but the final result was satisfying. Luckily, I found this awesome tutorial online that helped me build my first ever wooden phone holder.
Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.

Description: In this class period furniture maker Ray Journigan will show you why there were so many different types of planes and what each one was used for. Through demonstrations, he will show you why the most expensive plane is NOT necessary to get a perfect surface. Watch his procedure of making rough lumber turn into glass smooth, finish ready surfaces in just minutes, no sanding necessary! Ever wonder what to look for in a flea marker plane? How to sharpen it for razor thin shavings? How to set it up properly? What makes one plane better than another? Come see why every shop needs a good hand plane no matter what style furniture you make. If you are thinking about incorporating hand tools into your work, take this class before you buy your first hand plane.


Take advantage of this special '4 in 1' summer workshop ideal for expanding woodworking skills or for novices looking for a new craft. Begin by learning the artful processes of steam bending solid wood for functional and sculptural pieces, including lumber prep, building forms, and bending jigsaw drying racks.  Bringing your own unfinished pieces...
Another wooden item that I love very much is a beautiful mobile holder. You can see one in the image below. These things are not only beautiful, but they can comfortably hold any sized mobile and ensure proper safety. Another amazing thing is that they can be built in many shapes and sizes, as and how you need it. You can see some more examples at the source below
$1320.00 (Includes all Materials)             . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) This is one of our more popular classes. This beautiful table is well proportioned, with simple elegant lines that will grace any home. It can be used as a hall table, sofa table or an entry table. Imagine what your guest will say when they are welcome into your home and met with this stunning piece of furniture. This class covers all…
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.
×