Description: The bandsaw is one of your most versatile power tools, and this class will show you how to safely get the most out of it. Mike will show you how to set up your bandsaw for consistent accuracy and teach you proper blade selection. Learn how to perform straight cuts, curves, and how to rough saw cabriole lets. You'll also learn the secrets of resawing: a technique that can save you money and add uniqueness to your projects
We offer woodworking courses for nearly every craft in the field. From carpentry workshops to furniture making courses (and everything in between), you’ll have opportunities to work on a variety of projects and structures. Specialized courses like Surface Texturing and Relief Carving offer intensive training in new skill areas. As always, we have courses for all skill levels – Woodworking 101 is a perfect introduction for beginners.
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
Description: Using the skew is a challenge for many turners. This class will demystify the skew and show you how to avoid the dreaded run back. Proper sharpening and cutting geometry will be demonstrated and students will learn several basic skew cuts - roughing, peeling, planing, bead and cove cuts with the skew. The student will complete the class by turning a small tool handle with just the skew.
Why would you buy a costly platform bed from Ikea or somewhere else when you can make one yourself at home? Oh yes, you can. A bed is the most common furniture piece used in the house and probably the costliest one. Wouldn’t it be great if you could just make a bed of your own, without having to spend many bucks for buying one? So I am here sharing a great tutorial to help you to build a nice comfy platform bed that you can use anywhere in the house.
Designed for beginners with little to no woodworking experience, this five-session class covers wood physics, shop safety and etiquette, an introduction to joinery concepts, and hands-on experience with the most commonly used woodworking machines. The project for this class is a small side table featuring half-laps, bridle joints, and a round top....
The use of hand tools is often the favorite part of a woodworkers project; hand tools are quiet and demand a level of concentration that makes one forget about everything else. Immerse yourself in this one-day hand tools intensive taught by master craftsman Glen Guarino of Guarino Furniture Designs. Students will start out with a block of wood from...
The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.
And the fact is that you can make your own patio chair with several old but still good pallets. Here we are providing a tutorial that everybody can follow easily – it is very well-written and also self-explanatory, which is great for those who are a beginner at woodworking and have never completed a DIY project before. As you don’t need to be a professional woodworker or a handyman to complete this project, so it is not a difficult task – all you need is a bit of determination!​
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.
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