In this 5-day intensive you'll get hands-on training with essential hand tools--back saws, chisels, and planes--while making a classic hardwood mallet with simple and elegant joinery. You'll also learn how to keep your tools sharp and well-tuned. This class provides a solid foundation of skills and techniques for both small projects and more advanced...
From the source tutorial, you can get illustrates to the instruction about the plan. Everything is fairly described as diagrams, images, the list of supplies and tools need etc. The process to this plan is very easy to understand and follow for if you are having some basic woodworking knowledge. Make sure to collect all the supplies you need before you start with the project. You may even ask any question directly in the comment section of the tutorial post and also comment the images of your final product if you have completed it. Either way, I hope that you will manage to build this one nicely.​
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Our staff of instructors possess a wide variety of skills and interests but an intense passion for the subject they are teaching is common to them all. Whether it is a woodcarving class with Will Neptune, a furniture making class with the school’s director, Bob Van Dyke, or a class on inlay and bandings with Steve Latta, students are assured of thoroughly learning the skills in a relaxed hands-on atmosphere.
I recently came across this beautiful wooden swing set, which was made in the shape of a boat. Cool, isn’t it? The very first look was enough for me to start loving it. Although I haven’t yet tried building one myself, I am definitely going to. Later I realized that you can also build a baby cradle with the same idea. After all, what can be more calming than the tender rocking of a boat? This swing set will surely help your child get more gentle sleep.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Why would you buy a costly platform bed from Ikea or somewhere else when you can make one yourself at home? Oh yes, you can. A bed is the most common furniture piece used in the house and probably the costliest one. Wouldn’t it be great if you could just make a bed of your own, without having to spend many bucks for buying one? So I am here sharing a great tutorial to help you to build a nice comfy platform bed that you can use anywhere in the house.

We have a small dining room area in our farmhouse that is separate from the living room and kitchen. The area is much smaller in space than our last house. I was little confused that our typical rectangular farmhouse table was not going to cut it. So, I walked in I came to know that we needed to build a round dining table. So, I searched for a plan design idea and build a very own round farmhouse dining table. I was an amazing DIY plan, I just love it!
Description: Without a doubt, the tablesaw is the most important power tool in the shop. Safely ripping stock to width, accurately cutting parts to length, cutting angles, bevels and making tenons and tapers are just a few of the tasks that an accurately set up tablesaw excels at. Understanding how the saw works is one of the goals of this new class and basic common sense safety will be covered thoroughly. We will begin with techniques to make safe and specialized cuts such as making accurate tenons and miters. Saw blade selection, dado blades and some of the commercially available accessories will be discussed. We will also demonstrate some basic but important shop made jigs. While this class will mostly be dom only, students will have the opportunity to do some cutting on the saw in order to make sure that each participant understands the techniques being shown.

Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
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