The best thing about the toy chest is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can also modify your kid’s toy chest in any way you want or build in a different design or color different from the one pictured above. You can try some other designs for your plan in the below-mentioned link.
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
Description: In this information packed class, Brian will show you all you need to know to add turned elements to your next furniture project. While basic spindle turning will be covered in depth, you will also learn some unorthodox methods "cheaters" to achieve success. Reproducing parts without a duplicator will be covered. You will also learn what tool to choose for a particular job, how they are sharpened, offset turned legs, split turnings, and much more. With practice exercises, you will gain confidence with the gouge, scraper, and skew. After taking this class you will turn that scrap pile into more money or memories as they become candle stands or chess pieces.
Description: With endless possibilities, your biggest challenge will be deciding what you can do next with your scroll saw. This tool opens up the worlds of intarsia, fretwork, marquetry, and inlay work, just to begin! Learn blade selection, tensioning, and the pros and cons of fixed speed versus various speed saws while making several take-home projects.
Description: The intent of this class is to learn the basic skills and underlying principles used to construct an end grain board. This can be a cutting board, cheese board, butcher block, etc. The class is in three sessions because there are two overnight glue ups required. Day 1 we will discuss why to construct something end grain; how to prevent cracking; types of wood to use (and not use); required tools and their safe use; how to layout the board; performing the initial preparation of the stock and first glue up. Day 2 consists of cleaning the board up, cutting and arranging it into the desired final pattern, and the second glue up. Day 3 will be the final clean up; trimming; final sanding; edge routing/sanding; a discussion on finishes and how to maintain the board.
Really nice projects but I wish they didn’t use machines every every single step not everyone has a full commercial shop with huge commercial sized machines that cost thousands of dollars in their house. They need to start focusing on hand tools what what the average person has in their house like table saw and drills and stuff like that not everyone has a massive router table with specialty fence and machine or a commercial band saw or massive commercial table saw or huge joiners and thickness planners. It’s not prectical for most people. The steps are short too like Ok do this whole section on this commercial machine that not average woodworker owns and only someone with a commercial company would even have access to but those people aren’t buying this book because they know how to do these things already they don’t need a book telling them how to do what the legit do as a career. The people buying this book are normal people trying to do this as a hobby for fun at home. So cater to them don’t take a short cut because it’s easy for you to tell someone to do something you can do in two seconds but those people have to somehow figure out how to do this one their own in a way not shown in the book because they don’t have the machines you do. It’s Being lazy and writing a book that’s almost completely useless to someone trying to make these projects. But if I did own all these machines and has all that space and money and materials it’s a good book.
Wall-mounted or placed on a table or countertop, this handsome display cabinet is the perfect way to share any collection while keeping it clean and protected at the same time. Featuring tempered glass doors and three shelves, the cabinet’s design calls for all straight cuts and straightforward construction techniques (simple cut-outs give the effect of
The procedure is very easy to understand and follow for anyone with a little woodworking knowledge. Make sure to collect all the items you need before you start with the project. You may even ask Tracy your queries directly in the comment section of the tutorial post. Or you can ask them here. Either way, I hope that you manage to build this one nicely.

Always nice to see project ideas. Yet, to make a living while woodworking all projects need to be scaled up so that one can actually earn enough to survive and compete against the flood of Chinese imports and others. Substitute products made from plastic, metal or wood are a common place and normally cheaper due to mass production and human rights violations. Politicians don’t care about the disappearance of many of America’s Cottage Industries and most consumers don’t care as well.
Description: With endless possibilities, your biggest challenge will be deciding what you can do next with your scroll saw. This tool opens up the worlds of intarsia, fretwork, marquetry, and inlay work, just to begin! Learn blade selection, tensioning, and the pros and cons of fixed speed versus various speed saws while making several take-home projects.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Description: A foot stool is a great way to gain skills with hand tools. This useful piece of furniture can be used to rest the feet after a long day or as a sitting stool for that last arriving guest. In this class, after mastering mortise and tenons by hand, Ray will show you how to layout, cut, and shape Queen Anne cabriole legs without the need of a lathe. You may choose to carve ball & claw feet if you have already taken that class! Then, using rasp, spokeshaves, and scrapers, he will show you how to refine the curved shapes. For the more ambitious, Ray will demonstrate carving the applied scalloped shells that can be applied to the aprons and also how to execute the shell on the knees carved in the solid. You don't want to miss this one! It will take your woodworking to the next level! Now you will be ready to tackle the upcoming Queen Anne Side Chair! Tool List: You are encouraged to bring your general woodworking tools along with the following: For the Stool: 5/16" Mortise Chisel 1⁄4", 1⁄2", 3⁄4", 1" bench Chisels (If you have them) Mallet 6" or larger Rule Combination Square Tenon or Dovetail saw #49 or 50 Nicholson rasp or equalivant 10" Med cut cabinet file 8" Smooth cut wood file Spokeshave Square card scraper Smooth plane Block Plane Shoulder Plane Compass Carving parts: (optional): You are encouraged to bring your carving roll with chisels to include the following: 15/6mm v tool 7/14mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 2/12mm gouge 8/3mm gouge 2/30mm gouge 8/7mm gouge 5/8mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/10mm gouge 5/12mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/13mm gouge 5/25mm gouge 25/10mm Backbend gouge 7/6mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 7/10mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing)
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