Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
Description: One of the first hand held power tools every novice wood worker should have in their arsenal is the router. With an assortment of sharp cutter bits, the router will become one of the most used small power tools in the shop. Although highly versatile, the router can be very intimidating; due to its size and the speed and torque it develops. In the Router 101 class, students will learn how to choose a router, the types of bases used with the router, and the care and feeding (maintenance) of the router. Students will also learn about the categories of router bits, the components used to identify them, what goes into the making of a router bit, and what to look for in making a choice of which bit best meets their needs. So come on out, bring your router and bits if you have them and learn basic routing techniques and tips and tricks to enhance your routing skills.
Description: In this two day carving class the student will learn about the different styles of and how ball & claw feet were used on furniture of the 18th century. Come let Master carver and 2018 "Cartouche" winner Ray Journigan guide each student, even those will little carving experience, through the successful execution of carving a Philadelphia style Ball & Claw foot. Methods of layout, clamping, and tool sharpening will also be covered.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.

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