Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.

This is one of those things that you never know you need unless you have one. This amazing wooden sofa sleeve works perfectly on either or both sides of a sofa set. It gives your sofa a nice look. The sleeve can also be modified to include a cup holder, mobile holder, etc. You can easily find this item on any online furniture store, but an even better idea is to build one. This way, you can make a sofa sleeve design that you actually like and make space for cup and other things.

Description: In this class, Ray explains through demonstration the proper use, the making of all the joints used in 18th century furniture construction. The different types of dovetails, mortise and tenons, bridle joints, and others. While machine alternative methods will be discussed our focus will be on the use of hand tools to cut each joint. After watching the procedure demonstrated each student will be coached through their first attempt at each joint using their own hand tools. Learn how to properly and accurately layout and cut the perfect fitting joint! The best part is that these methods can be used on any style of furniture you wish to make ensuring they will last well over 200 years!
Here, I am writing about another DIY project that involves the use of an old furniture piece. I think that the idea of reusing and recycling old furniture has got to me. Anyways, I am starting to love it. This project involves using an old door to build a beautiful multi picture frame, as you can see in the image below. This frame looks really wonderful and can be used to hold many pictures at a time.
Here, I am writing about another DIY project that involves the use of an old furniture piece. I think that the idea of reusing and recycling old furniture has got to me. Anyways, I am starting to love it. This project involves using an old door to build a beautiful multi picture frame, as you can see in the image below. This frame looks really wonderful and can be used to hold many pictures at a time.
Description: In this information packed class, Brian will show you all you need to know to add turned elements to your next furniture project. While basic spindle turning will be covered in depth, you will also learn some unorthodox methods "cheaters" to achieve success. Reproducing parts without a duplicator will be covered. You will also learn what tool to choose for a particular job, how they are sharpened, offset turned legs, split turnings, and much more. With practice exercises, you will gain confidence with the gouge, scraper, and skew. After taking this class you will turn that scrap pile into more money or memories as they become candle stands or chess pieces.
Description: In this workshop, period furniture maker Ray Journigan will explain what you will need to start adding carvings to you furniture. It all starts with the proper set up at the workbench. Ray explains the importance of good lighting. Watch Ray as he carves a scalloped shell to show the different body and hand Ray will also explain what is needed to keep those tools razor sharp. Face it, carving tools are expensive. Ray explains what makes a good carving chisel and which tools makes a good starter set. If you are new to the idea of carving, get all your questions answered here before you start buying those tools!

Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.
Another wooden item that I love very much is a beautiful mobile holder. You can see one in the image below. These things are not only beautiful, but they can comfortably hold any sized mobile and ensure proper safety. Another amazing thing is that they can be built in many shapes and sizes, as and how you need it. You can see some more examples at the source below

Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a rule?


$360.00 (Includes all Materials except the Plane) $100.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) In this two day class we will reveal some of the secrets to tuning up a Japanese Hand Plane (Kanna) We will start with conditioning the Body of the Plane (DAI) to stabilize movement. Proper sharpening and grinding of the blade and chip breaker will be discussed and demonstrated. Custom fitting the blade to the Dai and conditioning the sole. We will also demystified the…


Building a Wooden Office Desk Organizer is an easy task for a professional woodworker, but not so much for normal people like you and me. But that doesn’t mean you cannot do this. Two years ago, I had almost no woodworking experience, but now I make most of my household and office wooden items by myself. This saves me a lot of money. And believe me when I say this; you can also manage to make wonderful wood items with a little practice and some woodworking experience.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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