This rack can be built from old unused wood pallets you can find around the house. So it is also a great way to recycle those old pallets. You can also find a step by step tutorial at instructables.com for which I have included the source link below. This tutorial helps you to make a wood wine rack from the scratch. So what are waiting for? Just grab the items you need and start building a cool wooden rack for those nice wine bottles of yours.

Description: Come spend some time with us and make a small (about sixteen inch tall) three legged stool. A perfect size to use as a foot stool or as a fire side stool. This class will teach a multitude of turning skills, from face plate and spindle turning to duplicating and assembly. Finishing options will also be discussed. The skills and knowledge learned can be used to make taller stools and may also be used for other turned furniture projects. Turning tools will be provided but you may bring your own.
Description: Have you ever gone to one of those expensive framing shops and been taken back by the cost of a picture frame? Here is the opportunity to learn how to make your own frames and save money. The Picture Framing class will show you the basics for measuring and making your own picture frames. You will be shown how to use woodworking joinery that can be incorporated in your framing projects which are not only functional, but decorative as well. You will use the jointer and table saw to square stock, the table saw and the electric miter saw to cut mitered corners, and the router table to create assorted decorative profiles for your frames. Students will make the components for an 8" X 10" picture frame.

Description: Learn the art of decorating wood with burning from craftsmen, Jim Vogel. Jim will introduce you the basic skills you will need to know to enjoy the art of Pyrography. Students will learn about the control unit, temperature control, pen and tip selection, and the care and maintenance of the tool and tips. You will also learn to select wood, patterns, and how to transfer patterns to wood. Students will make a practice board and learn the various textures and lines they can create with the basic pens/tips. You will start a small project to complete at home. Woodburning unit and tips will be provided.

Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.

The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?

This corner stone joint of western woodwork has also been used in the Japanese tradition for a long time. Class we will cover: sizing, proportioning, choice of angle, layout and cutting as well as where to use dovetails. You will see examples of full, half blind and blind dovetails. There will be a full cutting and assembly demonstration as well...
Our instructors work out of a 27,000 square-foot facility, where over 100 stationary and portable woodworking machines are available. We emphasize hands-on training and real-world experience, and all classes are project-focused. Over forty different classes cover topics including faceframe and frameless cabinet construction, CNC woodworking, architectural millwork, table and casegood construction, hand tools, woodturning, and veneering.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
We offer woodworking courses for nearly every craft in the field. From carpentry workshops to furniture making courses (and everything in between), you’ll have opportunities to work on a variety of projects and structures. Specialized courses like Surface Texturing and Relief Carving offer intensive training in new skill areas. As always, we have courses for all skill levels – Woodworking 101 is a perfect introduction for beginners.
Building a Wooden Office Desk Organizer is an easy task for a professional woodworker, but not so much for normal people like you and me. But that doesn’t mean you cannot do this. Two years ago, I had almost no woodworking experience, but now I make most of my household and office wooden items by myself. This saves me a lot of money. And believe me when I say this; you can also manage to make wonderful wood items with a little practice and some woodworking experience.
An ideal resource for woodworkers looking for a new project or wanting to spruce up their home! From kitchen improvements and storage solutions to classic furniture in the Craftsman and Adirondack styles, the experts at American Woodworker have provided plans and instructions for building 50 great-looking projects that will improve every space inside and outside your home.
This plan is probably the easiest plan ever added in the list. The one who is working on this project, don’t need any professional skills but just knowing some basics of woodworking will be enough for this DIY. You will get step by step detailed process of this tutorial in the source linked tutorial. This tutorial will surely help you to build this plan quickly.
Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.

Description: A foot stool is a great way to gain skills with hand tools. This useful piece of furniture can be used to rest the feet after a long day or as a sitting stool for that last arriving guest. In this class, after mastering mortise and tenons by hand, Ray will show you how to layout, cut, and shape Queen Anne cabriole legs without the need of a lathe. You may choose to carve ball & claw feet if you have already taken that class! Then, using rasp, spokeshaves, and scrapers, he will show you how to refine the curved shapes. For the more ambitious, Ray will demonstrate carving the applied scalloped shells that can be applied to the aprons and also how to execute the shell on the knees carved in the solid. You don't want to miss this one! It will take your woodworking to the next level! Now you will be ready to tackle the upcoming Queen Anne Side Chair! Tool List: You are encouraged to bring your general woodworking tools along with the following: For the Stool: 5/16" Mortise Chisel 1⁄4", 1⁄2", 3⁄4", 1" bench Chisels (If you have them) Mallet 6" or larger Rule Combination Square Tenon or Dovetail saw #49 or 50 Nicholson rasp or equalivant 10" Med cut cabinet file 8" Smooth cut wood file Spokeshave Square card scraper Smooth plane Block Plane Shoulder Plane Compass Carving parts: (optional): You are encouraged to bring your carving roll with chisels to include the following: 15/6mm v tool 7/14mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 2/12mm gouge 8/3mm gouge 2/30mm gouge 8/7mm gouge 5/8mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/10mm gouge 5/12mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/13mm gouge 5/25mm gouge 25/10mm Backbend gouge 7/6mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 7/10mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing)
If you bought this superb polished table in a store, it would cost you a fortune, but our detailed instructions will help you make one for less than $100. And it looks like highly polished stone, but no-one would know it’s actually made from concrete with a wooden base. Also, you can embellish the top with leaf prints, like the table shown here, or personalize it with glass or mosaic tiles or imprints of seashells.

Making an art or a design on a wooden piece is a hectic task and requires good art skills. But there is another much easier way to carve a beautiful art on any wood surface. For this, you will need the image or graphic that you want to transfer, a piece of wood, freezer paper, etc. I, myself have made several such designs. At the source below, you can find a step by step guide for transferring a graphic image to the wood.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
Description: Computer Numeric Control -- CNC – is a system where a user can conceive & design a project, then let the computer controlled hardware produce it. This class will explore the fundamentals of CNC processing including terminology, concepts, processes & hardware systems. We will work through the basic work flow of manufacturing by CNC by exploring in detail the stages of: concept definition, design, engineering, machining and finish & assembly. Each of these stages will be demonstrated using a project of the student's interest with a goal of completing the finished piece if student load and time permit.
Description: This is a more in depth class about bench planes than above. In this class, let period furniture maker Ray Journigan show you how to make using a bench plane your new favorite go to tool. Lean what makes one plane better than another? Then Ray demonstrates the steps of flattening a wide board using hand planes followed by each student having the opportunity to surface a board to "finish ready" without any sanding using their hand planes. In this class we take the plane apart and explain all the adjustments to properly tune up your hand plane. Then block planes are discussed showing their importance in furniture work. Next, for those REALLY interested in learning how different types of handplanes were used, Ray will show and demonstrate the use of specialty planes such as Rabbit planes, Shoulder planes, Dado planes, Dovetail planes, Scraper planes, and molding planes. Lastly we turn our attention to sharpening to a razor edge. Student leave with an eye opening experience having learned thru practice, the joy and ease of using hand planes.
I got this idea from a Pinterest post. The final product looks so beautiful that I just couldn’t wait to make one for myself. This was somewhat a different experience from my other regular DIY projects as it doesn’t involve making something from scratch, but turning an existing wood piece into another one. Nonetheless, I enjoyed it very much and the final product was very satisfying. The tutorial I used is linked below.
Description: If you have ever tried to sharpen a gouge, you know how frustrating it can be. We will show you how to save yourself time, frustration and money, and learn to grind your turning tools right the first time, every time. Brian will demonstrate various ways to sharpen your turning tools such as your skews, gouges and scrapers using different sharpening systems. If time permits, you will be able to sharpen a few of your own tools under his watchful eye.
Description: Do you and your significant other want to le3arn basic wood working skills and have fun creating a one of a kind project together? We will provide the food, soft drinks, and materials. You only need to show up and be ready to make some saw dust. Projects will vary from month to month and will consist of small projects such as pens, bottle stoppers/openers, pepper grinders, etc.
It is one of the easiest woodwork projects we are going to discuss today. Although it looks very easy to make, I still could not find any good tutorial on the internet that explains how to build this one. So I am here sharing an article link that gets the closest. The article explains how to make different kinds of DIY candle holders and what items you may need for the project.
Hi Liz. I am sorry you were having trouble unsubscribing to the newsletter. Your information has been updated. Your email address has been removed from our Woodworkers Guild of America E-Newsletter mailing list. Please allow up to 5 business days for your request to be completed. If you have any questions, please contact our customer service team at 1-855-253-0822.
×