Description: Have you ever gone to one of those expensive framing shops and been taken back by the cost of a picture frame? Here is the opportunity to learn how to make your own frames and save money. The Picture Framing class will show you the basics for measuring and making your own picture frames. You will be shown how to use woodworking joinery that can be incorporated in your framing projects which are not only functional, but decorative as well. You will use the jointer and table saw to square stock, the table saw and the electric miter saw to cut mitered corners, and the router table to create assorted decorative profiles for your frames. Students will make the components for an 8" X 10" picture frame.
Description: One of the first hand held power tools every novice wood worker should have in their arsenal is the router. With an assortment of sharp cutter bits, the router will become one of the most used small power tools in the shop. Although highly versatile, the router can be very intimidating; due to its size and the speed and torque it develops. In the Router 101 class, students will learn how to choose a router, the types of bases used with the router, and the care and feeding (maintenance) of the router. Students will also learn about the categories of router bits, the components used to identify them, what goes into the making of a router bit, and what to look for in making a choice of which bit best meets their needs. So come on out, bring your router and bits if you have them and learn basic routing techniques and tips and tricks to enhance your routing skills.

Building a bookcase or bookshelf is a fairly simple woodworking plan that you can get done in just a day or two. This is also a low-cost project as well and since the project idea is free, you don't have to worry about busting through your budget. Just follow the simple steps in the tutorial and enjoy your own company building a simple bookcase on this weekend.
Description: You're not finished until it's finished and this course help add the perfect touch to complete your project. You'll learn the concepts behind finishing, how to prepare your surface, how staining and dye work, and several basic finishes. You will practice the specific skills you need to apply a general purpose finish to your prized projects.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.

Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.


Take advantage of this special '4 in 1' summer workshop ideal for expanding woodworking skills or for novices looking for a new craft. Begin by learning the artful processes of steam bending solid wood for functional and sculptural pieces, including lumber prep, building forms, and bending jigsaw drying racks.  Bringing your own unfinished pieces...
Wall-mounted or placed on a table or countertop, this handsome display cabinet is the perfect way to share any collection while keeping it clean and protected at the same time. Featuring tempered glass doors and three shelves, the cabinet’s design calls for all straight cuts and straightforward construction techniques (simple cut-outs give the effect of
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
$1555.00 (Includes all Materials)                        . $500.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) This is perhaps the most difficult class we offer at our school. This class is not for the faint hearted. This chair will challenge every area of your woodworking skill. We will be dealing with angles, proportion, chair design, choosing wood grain, sculpting of the crest rail using an angle grinder, inlay techniques for the back…

Description: If you have taken Carving 101 and/or Chip Carving classes and want to work on basic techniques and interesting new patterns to develop your skills, this workshop is for you! Jim will help you refresh basic techniques and sharpen your skills through discussion and demonstration. He will share new patterns and refine your carving technique in a hands on practice clinic. Jim will also provide sharpening instruction to keep your tools cutting clean chips every time.
Description: The dovetail joint stands as the symbol of hand tool craftsmanship and for many is regarded as the most challenging test of their skills. Students will learn simple exercises that will give them great confidence with basic hand tools. Ray will provide personal attention and hands-on practice for everyone to learn the layout, sawing, chiseling and assembling of the joint. Both full and half blind dovetails will be covered.

Another wooden item that I love very much is a beautiful mobile holder. You can see one in the image below. These things are not only beautiful, but they can comfortably hold any sized mobile and ensure proper safety. Another amazing thing is that they can be built in many shapes and sizes, as and how you need it. You can see some more examples at the source below
Description: Do you and your significant other want to learn basic wood working skills and have fun creating a one of a kind project together? We will provide the snacks, soft drinks, and materials. You only need to show up and be ready to make some saw dust. Projects will vary from month to month and will consist of small projects such as pens, bottle stoppers, bottle openers, picture holders, and wine bottle holders. This months project will be ... Tuition Of $150 Is PER COUPLE

We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Our instructors work out of a 27,000 square-foot facility, where over 100 stationary and portable woodworking machines are available. We emphasize hands-on training and real-world experience, and all classes are project-focused. Over forty different classes cover topics including faceframe and frameless cabinet construction, CNC woodworking, architectural millwork, table and casegood construction, hand tools, woodturning, and veneering.
This is definitely going to be one of the easiest woodworking projects you’ll be reading about today. So why not just get started? The tutorial link is given below. Just do exactly what they are saying in the tutorial and you will end up making a beautiful wooden doormat just like the one in the image above. They are using pine wood to build this doormat. You can choose any wood material that best suits your budget.
We have compiled a listing of select woodworking schools which offer woodworking classes in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia-Pacific. We urge you to check-out local woodworking clubs, community college, and high school adult education programs first. They are often overlooked and offer some of the best courses to develop and build woodworking skills.
A super simple iPad Dock/stand made out of a single block of wood features an angled groove which gets to support the tablet device and a cut in a hole to revise access to the home button of your iPad. It’s possible to drill an access channel in the stand through which you can run a charging cable, although this mini stripped back iPad stand may have very limited functions.
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