Building a Wooden Office Desk Organizer is an easy task for a professional woodworker, but not so much for normal people like you and me. But that doesn’t mean you cannot do this. Two years ago, I had almost no woodworking experience, but now I make most of my household and office wooden items by myself. This saves me a lot of money. And believe me when I say this; you can also manage to make wonderful wood items with a little practice and some woodworking experience.
Description: A foot stool is a great way to gain skills with hand tools. This useful piece of furniture can be used to rest the feet after a long day or as a sitting stool for that last arriving guest. In this class, after mastering mortise and tenons by hand, Ray will show you how to layout, cut, and shape Queen Anne cabriole legs without the need of a lathe. You may choose to carve ball & claw feet if you have already taken that class! Then, using rasp, spokeshaves, and scrapers, he will show you how to refine the curved shapes. For the more ambitious, Ray will demonstrate carving the applied scalloped shells that can be applied to the aprons and also how to execute the shell on the knees carved in the solid. You don't want to miss this one! It will take your woodworking to the next level! Now you will be ready to tackle the upcoming Queen Anne Side Chair! Tool List: You are encouraged to bring your general woodworking tools along with the following: For the Stool: 5/16" Mortise Chisel 1⁄4", 1⁄2", 3⁄4", 1" bench Chisels (If you have them) Mallet 6" or larger Rule Combination Square Tenon or Dovetail saw #49 or 50 Nicholson rasp or equalivant 10" Med cut cabinet file 8" Smooth cut wood file Spokeshave Square card scraper Smooth plane Block Plane Shoulder Plane Compass Carving parts: (optional): You are encouraged to bring your carving roll with chisels to include the following: 15/6mm v tool 7/14mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 2/12mm gouge 8/3mm gouge 2/30mm gouge 8/7mm gouge 5/8mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/10mm gouge 5/12mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 8/13mm gouge 5/25mm gouge 25/10mm Backbend gouge 7/6mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing) 7/10mm gouge (fishtail if purchasing)

Another wooden item that I love very much is a beautiful mobile holder. You can see one in the image below. These things are not only beautiful, but they can comfortably hold any sized mobile and ensure proper safety. Another amazing thing is that they can be built in many shapes and sizes, as and how you need it. You can see some more examples at the source below
I got this idea from a Pinterest post. The final product looks so beautiful that I just couldn’t wait to make one for myself. This was somewhat a different experience from my other regular DIY projects as it doesn’t involve making something from scratch, but turning an existing wood piece into another one. Nonetheless, I enjoyed it very much and the final product was very satisfying. The tutorial I used is linked below.
A few days back, I was searching for some cool DIY plans. So, I got to work and ended up coming up with some easy to follow project and an awesome new ice chest cooler to have out on the deck! It was going to be perfect for summer hangouts and barbecues. It was a fun and practical plan to work on and I know you will have fun tackling select a design from this plan and start building your own. Enjoy learning how you can build a rustic cooler also sing the video tutorial and source tutorial plan!

I recently came across this beautiful wooden swing set, which was made in the shape of a boat. Cool, isn’t it? The very first look was enough for me to start loving it. Although I haven’t yet tried building one myself, I am definitely going to. Later I realized that you can also build a baby cradle with the same idea. After all, what can be more calming than the tender rocking of a boat? This swing set will surely help your child get more gentle sleep.


Designed for beginners with little to no woodworking experience, this five-session class covers wood physics, shop safety and etiquette, an introduction to joinery concepts, and hands-on experience with the most commonly used woodworking machines. The project for this class is a small side table featuring half-laps, bridle joints, and a round top....
Description: Spend a weekend with Woodcraft and leave with a traditional Adirondack chair. This course is designed for the entry to intermediate level woodworker who would like to improve their furniture building skills. You will work with both power and hand tools to cut, drill, sand and assemble this classic chair. Instructions, drawings, cypress wood and fasteners are included in the tuition.
Description: New to the shop environment? Not comfortable around machinery? Spend a day getting to know your way around with one of our experienced instructors. Students will learn the purpose and safe operations of the primary stationary tools such as the tablesaw, jointer, planer, bandsaw and drill press. This hands on class will give you a taste of how these tools take raw material and turn it into finished projects. To the beginner woodworker, this class will pave the way for participation in Woodworking Fundamentals 1.
Description: Want to learn the basics of wood turning or refresh your skills from Jr. High shop class? This class covers the basics, including shop and lathe safety, tool identification and selection, mounting wood to the lathe and wood selection. In the first half of the class students will turn the handle for a 1/4" turning tool to take home. In the second half they will work on a small project determined by the instructor.
What is the one thing every woodworker needs? Yes, a workbench. Now that you have or at least I am assuming you have worked on so many woodworking projects, you are close to becoming a professional woodworker. You now probably owe yourself a nice woodworking bench. You should also know that a true woodworker never buys his bench from the market, but always builds one himself. But before you start this project, you should know what a workbench is.
The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.
Here, I am writing about another DIY project that involves the use of an old furniture piece. I think that the idea of reusing and recycling old furniture has got to me. Anyways, I am starting to love it. This project involves using an old door to build a beautiful multi picture frame, as you can see in the image below. This frame looks really wonderful and can be used to hold many pictures at a time.
Description: The dovetail joint stands as the symbol of hand tool craftsmanship and for many is regarded as the most challenging test of their skills. Students will learn simple exercises that will give them great confidence with basic hand tools. Ray will provide personal attention and hands-on practice for everyone to learn the layout, sawing, chiseling and assembling of the joint. Both full and half blind dovetails will be covered.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
We have a small dining room area in our farmhouse that is separate from the living room and kitchen. The area is much smaller in space than our last house. I was little confused that our typical rectangular farmhouse table was not going to cut it. So, I walked in I came to know that we needed to build a round dining table. So, I searched for a plan design idea and build a very own round farmhouse dining table. I was an amazing DIY plan, I just love it!
Woodworking classes and seminars from Highland Woodworking. For more than 35 years, we have attracted to Atlanta nationally known woodworking masters and prominent authors including Tage Frid, Sam Maloof, Chris Schwarz, Jeff Miller, Peter Galbert, Roy Underhill and the likes. With the help of numerous other teachers and craftsmen our woodworking programs have inspired and taught thousands of woodworkers to become better at their craft. We consider it great fortune to be in this company and to be able to offer our woodworking classes, seminars and workshops to you. You can check out some of the woodworking action on the Gallery Pages of our site.
Description: If you have ever tried to sharpen a gouge, you know how frustrating it can be. We will show you how to save yourself time, frustration and money, and learn to grind your turning tools right the first time, every time. Brian will demonstrate various ways to sharpen your turning tools such as your skews, gouges and scrapers using different sharpening systems. If time permits, you will be able to sharpen a few of your own tools under his watchful eye.
The best thing about this wine rack is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can modify your wine rack any way you want or build in a design or color different from this one. The basic steps to build a wooden wine rack are the same for all variants. I have included here the video tutorial that I followed in order to build myself a pallet wide rack.
There are many ways to learn woodworking.  Books and DVDs are a great source of information, and there's nothing wrong with trial ans error.  But if you really want to sharpen your skills or pick up a new technique, nothing beats a woodworking class. If you live within traveling distance of one of the many Rockler Woodworking and Hardware store's that offer classes, you're really in luck.  The woodworking classes held at Rockler retail stores are taught by experienced woodworkers who are enthusiastic about their craft.  Class sizes are small - 10 students or less in most cases - so you can expect the kind of individualized instruction that really helps when you're learning something new. Here's a sample of the great woodworking instruction upcoming at Rockler retail stores around the country:

Learn how to generate, refine and communicate your furniture designs through different types of drawing. Develop fundamental two-dimensional and three-dimensional drawing skills. Explore axonometric drawing as well as two- and three-point perspective. Practice skating, presentation drawing and drafting. Experience different tools and techniques. Enrich...
Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.
Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Free next Tuesday evening? The Minneapolis store is offering a class on panel door construction August 1, from 5:00 to 9:00 pm.  You'll learn everything you need to know about this fundamental cabinetmaker's skill to make standard and arched top raised panel doors. August 5 at the Denver store, Cindy Drozda will offer instruction in the techniques she uses to produce her signature style lidded containers (see "Yemaya," above).  This is a great opportunity to learn from a master wood turner who has elevated the craft to the level of fine art.  Students will work on their own projects and most will take home a completed container. Also on August 5, the Phoenix store is offering an advanced turning class.  If you are an intermediate-level wood turner, this would be an excellent opportunity to sharpen your skills and learn techniques that go beyond the basics.
Here, I am writing about another DIY project that involves the use of an old furniture piece. I think that the idea of reusing and recycling old furniture has got to me. Anyways, I am starting to love it. This project involves using an old door to build a beautiful multi picture frame, as you can see in the image below. This frame looks really wonderful and can be used to hold many pictures at a time.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
Building a bookcase or bookshelf is a fairly simple woodworking plan that you can get done in just a day or two. This is also a low-cost project as well and since the project idea is free, you don't have to worry about busting through your budget. Just follow the simple steps in the tutorial and enjoy your own company building a simple bookcase on this weekend.
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