Description: In this class you will learn, through demonstrations and exercises, the fundamentals of carving that will provide a solid foundation for all types of carving. Learn about carving materials and tools, how to sharpen and get the most out of each tool, how to read and carve in relation to wood grain, how to set up a work station, and about different styles of carving. Together we'll execute, beads, rosettes, volutes, "C" scroll, and more. You'll leave with the understanding and confidence to grow and explore with this new found skill!


This corner stone joint of western woodwork has also been used in the Japanese tradition for a long time. Class we will cover: sizing, proportioning, choice of angle, layout and cutting as well as where to use dovetails. You will see examples of full, half blind and blind dovetails. There will be a full cutting and assembly demonstration as well...
Description: Learn to make a cutting board with various species of wood. You will prepare, glue, cut on a band saw, rout, and finally apply a food-safe finish. This process will result in a stunning cutting board! You will learn how to use a router and one of our templates to make a fun shape or choose to keep a traditional rectangular shape. Some sanding and finishing will need to be completed at home.
Using shelving in your room or kitchen is a great way to arrange and de-clutter space… I know, such ground-breaking term it is. Do not write me off yet, I just want to show you how you can build some clean floating corner shelving that appears to have no brackets. You can create them at no cost, and the hardest part of the plan is figuring out what you are going to put on these shelves when you are finished.
Description: Come spend some time with us and make a small (about sixteen inch tall) three legged stool. A perfect size to use as a foot stool or as a fire side stool. This class will teach a multitude of turning skills, from face plate and spindle turning to duplicating and assembly. Finishing options will also be discussed. The skills and knowledge learned can be used to make taller stools and may also be used for other turned furniture projects. Turning tools will be provided but you may bring your own.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
Really nice projects but I wish they didn’t use machines every every single step not everyone has a full commercial shop with huge commercial sized machines that cost thousands of dollars in their house. They need to start focusing on hand tools what what the average person has in their house like table saw and drills and stuff like that not everyone has a massive router table with specialty fence and machine or a commercial band saw or massive commercial table saw or huge joiners and thickness planners. It’s not prectical for most people. The steps are short too like Ok do this whole section on this commercial machine that not average woodworker owns and only someone with a commercial company would even have access to but those people aren’t buying this book because they know how to do these things already they don’t need a book telling them how to do what the legit do as a career. The people buying this book are normal people trying to do this as a hobby for fun at home. So cater to them don’t take a short cut because it’s easy for you to tell someone to do something you can do in two seconds but those people have to somehow figure out how to do this one their own in a way not shown in the book because they don’t have the machines you do. It’s Being lazy and writing a book that’s almost completely useless to someone trying to make these projects. But if I did own all these machines and has all that space and money and materials it’s a good book.

$875.00 (Includes all Materials)         . $300.00 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) We have an exceptional opportunity offering a class taught by David A Wade, who had worked along side Sam Maloof for over 25 years. David sculpted many of Sam’s creations from the iconic sculpted rocking chair to the sculpted table. Many refer to sculpted Maloof pieces as “sensuous” and are drawn to touch his works. Every woodworker desiring to enhance their craft will benefit…
An ideal resource for woodworkers looking for a new project or wanting to spruce up their home! From kitchen improvements and storage solutions to classic furniture in the Craftsman and Adirondack styles, the experts at American Woodworker have provided plans and instructions for building 50 great-looking projects that will improve every space inside and outside your home.
And the fact is that you can make your own patio chair with several old but still good pallets. Here we are providing a tutorial that everybody can follow easily – it is very well-written and also self-explanatory, which is great for those who are a beginner at woodworking and have never completed a DIY project before. As you don’t need to be a professional woodworker or a handyman to complete this project, so it is not a difficult task – all you need is a bit of determination!​

The space behind a door is a storage spot that’s often overlooked. Build a set of shallow shelves and mount it to the wall behind your laundry room door. The materials are inexpensive. Measure the distance between the door hinge and the wall and subtract an inch. This is the maximum depth of the shelves. We used 1x4s for the sides, top and shelves. Screw the sides to the top. Then screw three 1×2 hanging strips to the sides: one top and bottom and one centered. Nail metal shelf standards to the sides. Complete the shelves by nailing a 1×2 trim piece to the sides and top. The 1×2 dresses up the shelf unit and keeps the shelves from falling off the shelf clips.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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