There’s something so satisfying about creating something out of nothing. That’s why we think woodworking is one of the greatest hobbies out there. You can create your very own functional pieces and add your own flare to it, feeling accomplished and proud every time you lay your eyes on your project. Plus, it’s a great way to stay under budget when decorating your home or giving beautiful gifts. In the long run, the price of lumber and tools is far less than the price of buying a piece new that would be simple to build at home.
We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
Using shelving in your room or kitchen is a great way to arrange and de-clutter space… I know, such ground-breaking term it is. Do not write me off yet, I just want to show you how you can build some clean floating corner shelving that appears to have no brackets. You can create them at no cost, and the hardest part of the plan is figuring out what you are going to put on these shelves when you are finished.
Description: Come explore the world of chip carving! Geometric and free form designs created with a cutting knife and stab knife provide tremendous opportunities for artistic expression based on generations of tradition. This hands-on class will cover carving techniques, traditional as well as free form designs, layout and knife sharpening methods. Tools required: Chip carving cutting knife and stab knife, mechanical pencil with .5mm lead, eraser, T-square, and draftsman's compass. Recommended reading: The Complete Guide to Chip Carving by Wayne Barton.

Woodworking classes and seminars from Highland Woodworking. For more than 35 years, we have attracted to Atlanta nationally known woodworking masters and prominent authors including Tage Frid, Sam Maloof, Chris Schwarz, Jeff Miller, Peter Galbert, Roy Underhill and the likes. With the help of numerous other teachers and craftsmen our woodworking programs have inspired and taught thousands of woodworkers to become better at their craft. We consider it great fortune to be in this company and to be able to offer our woodworking classes, seminars and workshops to you. You can check out some of the woodworking action on the Gallery Pages of our site.
Description: A sharp tool is a turner's best friend. If you are having difficulty achieving smooth cuts and relying on scraping rather than cutting then this is the class for you. In this class you will learn a quick and easy way to repeatedly and consistently sharpen all of your wood turning tools using the Wolverine sharpening system on a slow speed grinder. The Varigrind jig will be demystified and you will be show a simple method to sharpen all of your bowl and spindle gouges. Sharpening the spindle roughing gouge, skew, and scraper will also be discussed and demonstrated. Bring your turning tools - as many as you want to sharpen to practice your skills in class.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
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