Description: Lidded boxes are small "Treasure Chests" that can be made in many shapes and sizes on a lathe. They have been made many ways over the years with different options and embellishments. In this class, Dave Robinson breaks lidded box building down to the simplest and fastest method to complete the project. We will explore some of the fancier options that students can take to the next level on their own such as threaded lids, metal, exotic wood, and stone powder inlays. By sticking to the basics and the easiest ways, students will go home with a finished lidded box at the end of this session. Skills developed in this class translate to making a pepper mill and turning a platter or a bowl.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
Take advantage of this special '4 in 1' summer workshop ideal for expanding woodworking skills or for novices looking for a new craft. Begin by learning the artful processes of steam bending solid wood for functional and sculptural pieces, including lumber prep, building forms, and bending jigsaw drying racks.  Bringing your own unfinished pieces...
Description: The intent of this class is to learn the basic skills and underlying principles used to construct an end grain board. This can be a cutting board, cheese board, butcher block, etc. The class is in three sessions because there are two overnight glue ups required. Day 1 we will discuss why to construct something end grain; how to prevent cracking; types of wood to use (and not use); required tools and their safe use; how to layout the board; performing the initial preparation of the stock and first glue up. Day 2 consists of cleaning the board up, cutting and arranging it into the desired final pattern, and the second glue up. Day 3 will be the final clean up; trimming; final sanding; edge routing/sanding; a discussion on finishes and how to maintain the board.
Description: Do you and your significant other want to learn basic wood working skills and have fun creating a one of a kind project together? We will provide the food, soft drinks, and materials. You only need to show up and be ready to make some saw dust. Projects will vary from month to month and will consist of small projects such as pens, bottle stoppers/openers, pepper grinders, etc.
Looking to jump right into the world of fine woodworking? Is your goal is to continue creating projects long after attending one of our workshops? Then Introduction to Furniture Making is for you! Throughout this 16 hour intensive workshop (split over 4 or 6 sessions), students will build a solid foundation for their new venture into woodworking....
A few days back, I was searching for some cool DIY plans. So, I got to work and ended up coming up with some easy to follow project and an awesome new ice chest cooler to have out on the deck! It was going to be perfect for summer hangouts and barbecues. It was a fun and practical plan to work on and I know you will have fun tackling select a design from this plan and start building your own. Enjoy learning how you can build a rustic cooler also sing the video tutorial and source tutorial plan!
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.

Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
Some tools that are required for this project are Miter saw, drilling machine, pencil, tape measure, screws, etc. Those, who prefer a video tutorial instead, can visit the below link to a YouTube video tutorial that illustrates the process of creating a DIY Beer Bottle Crate. The video tutorial explains every step properly so that anyone can make a Beer bottle crate easily.

A super simple iPad Dock/stand made out of a single block of wood features an angled groove which gets to support the tablet device and a cut in a hole to revise access to the home button of your iPad. It’s possible to drill an access channel in the stand through which you can run a charging cable, although this mini stripped back iPad stand may have very limited functions.
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