Description: Have you ever gone to one of those expensive framing shops and been taken back by the cost of a picture frame? Here is the opportunity to learn how to make your own frames and save money. The Picture Framing class will show you the basics for measuring and making your own picture frames. You will be shown how to use woodworking joinery that can be incorporated in your framing projects which are not only functional, but decorative as well. You will use the jointer and table saw to square stock, the table saw and the electric miter saw to cut mitered corners, and the router table to create assorted decorative profiles for your frames. Students will make the components for an 8" X 10" picture frame.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a ruler.
Description: Using the skew is a challenge for many turners. This class will demystify the skew and show you how to avoid the dreaded run back. Proper sharpening and cutting geometry will be demonstrated and students will learn several basic skew cuts - roughing, peeling, planing, bead and cove cuts with the skew. The student will complete the class by turning a small tool handle with just the skew.
Description: If you have taken Carving 101 and/or Chip Carving classes and want to work on basic techniques and interesting new patterns to develop your skills, this workshop is for you! Jim will help you refresh basic techniques and sharpen your skills through discussion and demonstration. He will share new patterns and refine your carving technique in a hands on practice clinic. Jim will also provide sharpening instruction to keep your tools cutting clean chips every time.
The space behind a door is a storage spot that’s often overlooked. Build a set of shallow shelves and mount it to the wall behind your laundry room door. The materials are inexpensive. Measure the distance between the door hinge and the wall and subtract an inch. This is the maximum depth of the shelves. We used 1x4s for the sides, top and shelves. Screw the sides to the top. Then screw three 1×2 hanging strips to the sides: one top and bottom and one centered. Nail metal shelf standards to the sides. Complete the shelves by nailing a 1×2 trim piece to the sides and top. The 1×2 dresses up the shelf unit and keeps the shelves from falling off the shelf clips.
Description: One of the first hand held power tools every novice wood worker should have in their arsenal is the router. With an assortment of sharp cutter bits, the router will become one of the most used small power tools in the shop. Although highly versatile, the router can be very intimidating; due to its size and the speed and torque it develops. In the Router 101 class, students will learn how to choose a router, the types of bases used with the router, and the care and feeding (maintenance) of the router. Students will also learn about the categories of router bits, the components used to identify them, what goes into the making of a router bit, and what to look for in making a choice of which bit best meets their needs. So come on out, bring your router and bits if you have them and learn basic routing techniques and tips and tricks to enhance your routing skills.
The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.
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