Description: Have you toyed with the idea of building your own cabinets for the kitchen, or the garage? And, as all woodworkers realize, the shop never has enough storage? If this synopsis connects with you, then Woodcraft's new Cabinet Making Series may fill the bill for you. The Cabinet Making Series is designed to maintain continuity by combining all the components of basic cabinetry in 17 hours (three sessions) of classroom and ptractical hands on instruction. Students will learn bisc fundamentals in how to choose and prepare stock to construct Base Units, Upper Wall Units, Drawers and Raised Panel Doors. Stock preparation will be accomplished utilizing the jointer, planer, electric miter saw, tablesaw and router table. Cabinet carcasses will be assembled using standard techniques and face frames will be assembled and attached using the Kreg Pocket Hole System. So, come on out, learn the techniques for making your own cabinets from the planning stage to ta finished product complete with drawers and doors.
Some tools that are required for this project are Miter saw, drilling machine, pencil, tape measure, screws, etc. Those, who prefer a video tutorial instead, can visit the below link to a YouTube video tutorial that illustrates the process of creating a DIY Beer Bottle Crate. The video tutorial explains every step properly so that anyone can make a Beer bottle crate easily.
The space behind a door is a storage spot that’s often overlooked. Build a set of shallow shelves and mount it to the wall behind your laundry room door. The materials are inexpensive. Measure the distance between the door hinge and the wall and subtract an inch. This is the maximum depth of the shelves. We used 1x4s for the sides, top and shelves. Screw the sides to the top. Then screw three 1×2 hanging strips to the sides: one top and bottom and one centered. Nail metal shelf standards to the sides. Complete the shelves by nailing a 1×2 trim piece to the sides and top. The 1×2 dresses up the shelf unit and keeps the shelves from falling off the shelf clips.

Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.

The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
We have compiled a listing of select woodworking schools which offer woodworking classes in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia-Pacific. We urge you to check-out local woodworking clubs, community college, and high school adult education programs first. They are often overlooked and offer some of the best courses to develop and build woodworking skills.
Description: In this class you will learn, through demonstrations and exercises, the fundamentals of carving that will provide a solid foundation for all types of carving. Learn about carving materials and tools, how to sharpen and get the most out of each tool, how to read and carve in relation to wood grain, how to set up a work station, and about different styles of carving. Together we'll execute, beads, rosettes, volutes, "C" scroll, and more. You'll leave with the understanding and confidence to grow and explore with this new found skill!
Here, I am writing about another DIY project that involves the use of an old furniture piece. I think that the idea of reusing and recycling old furniture has got to me. Anyways, I am starting to love it. This project involves using an old door to build a beautiful multi picture frame, as you can see in the image below. This frame looks really wonderful and can be used to hold many pictures at a time.
Description: New to woodworking or looking to refresh your skills? What to see how someone else would do it? We have different Fundamentals classes where instructors teach you the skills to safely and properly use equipment, tools and jigs. In all classes you will learn about taking rough wood into a finished piece using the planer, jointer, mitersaw and tablesaw. In this class you will make a small sliding bookshelf.
Description: Without a doubt, the tablesaw is the most important power tool in the shop. Safely ripping stock to width, accurately cutting parts to length, cutting angles, bevels and making tenons and tapers are just a few of the tasks that an accurately set up tablesaw excels at. Understanding how the saw works is one of the goals of this new class and basic common sense safety will be covered thoroughly. We will begin with techniques to make safe and specialized cuts such as making accurate tenons and miters. Saw blade selection, dado blades and some of the commercially available accessories will be discussed. We will also demonstrate some basic but important shop made jigs. While this class will mostly be dom only, students will have the opportunity to do some cutting on the saw in order to make sure that each participant understands the techniques being shown.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
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