Description: Computer Numeric Control -- CNC – is a system where a user can conceive & design a project, then let the computer controlled hardware produce it. This class will explore the fundamentals of CNC processing including terminology, concepts, processes & hardware systems. We will work through the basic work flow of manufacturing by CNC by exploring in detail the stages of: concept definition, design, engineering, machining and finish & assembly. Each of these stages will be demonstrated using a project of the student's interest with a goal of completing the finished piece if student load and time permit.
By video tutorial, you will get step by step process instructions of making a nice wooden folding sling chair from scratch. However, my first wooden chair was not the best one, but it was good enough to motivate me to make some more folding chairs like this one. If I can make this, you too can make one yourself. You can browse the internet for more folding sling chairs ideas and start making one now.
Description: In this class, Ray explains through demonstration the proper use, the making of all the joints used in 18th century furniture construction. The different types of dovetails, mortise and tenons, bridle joints, and others. While machine alternative methods will be discussed our focus will be on the use of hand tools to cut each joint. After watching the procedure demonstrated each student will be coached through their first attempt at each joint using their own hand tools. Learn how to properly and accurately layout and cut the perfect fitting joint! The best part is that these methods can be used on any style of furniture you wish to make ensuring they will last well over 200 years!
Description: Have you toyed with the idea of building your own cabinets for the kitchen, or the garage? And, as all woodworkers realize, the shop never has enough storage? If this synopsis connects with you, then Woodcraft's new Cabinet Making Series may fill the bill for you. The Cabinet Making Series is designed to maintain continuity by combining all the components of basic cabinetry in 17 hours (three sessions) of classroom and ptractical hands on instruction. Students will learn bisc fundamentals in how to choose and prepare stock to construct Base Units, Upper Wall Units, Drawers and Raised Panel Doors. Stock preparation will be accomplished utilizing the jointer, planer, electric miter saw, tablesaw and router table. Cabinet carcasses will be assembled using standard techniques and face frames will be assembled and attached using the Kreg Pocket Hole System. So, come on out, learn the techniques for making your own cabinets from the planning stage to ta finished product complete with drawers and doors.
The mission of the Fine Woodworking Department is to provide our students with opportunities for growth and development that set the foundation for life-long learning, academic achievement, and career accomplishment. We do this through three quality educational programs; traditional woodworking, advanced woodworking technology and lutherie. We encourage a passion for learning, through creativity, a commitment to excellence, and dedication to our students, and the communities we serve.
Our staff of instructors possess a wide variety of skills and interests but an intense passion for the subject they are teaching is common to them all. Whether it is a woodcarving class with Will Neptune, a furniture making class with the school’s director, Bob Van Dyke, or a class on inlay and bandings with Steve Latta, students are assured of thoroughly learning the skills in a relaxed hands-on atmosphere.
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.

This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!

The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.

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