Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
Description: Do you and your significant other want to learn basic wood working skills and have fun creating a one of a kind project together? We will provide the snacks, soft drinks, and materials. You only need to show up and be ready to make some saw dust. Projects will vary from month to month and will consist of small projects such as pens, bottle stoppers, bottle openers, picture holders, and wine bottle holders. This months project will be ... Tuition Of $150 Is PER COUPLE
Description: Using the skew is a challenge for many turners. This class will demystify the skew and show you how to avoid the dreaded run back. Proper sharpening and cutting geometry will be demonstrated and students will learn several basic skew cuts - roughing, peeling, planing, bead and cove cuts with the skew. The student will complete the class by turning a small tool handle with just the skew.
Learn fundamentals as you work a given plan through to completion. With a focus on six essential power tools, learn properties of wood and shop etiquette, interpret a plan, cut and mill stock and use basic machine joinery. This class qualifies students for intermediate classes and for Woodworking Open Shop. It is our gateway to more advanced woodworking. Complete attendance is required to fulfill this requirement. See our withdrawal policies online. Limit 8 students
A small oak table is a very useful wooden item for every household. You can yourself make a nice, strong and beautiful oak table suitable for any purpose. See the image below. As you can see, it is a small, yet good enough table to be used as a coffee table, lamp stand, breakfast table, etc. You can also find many other design variants on the internet. Choose the one you want for yourself and start making it now.

I am sharing here a link to the detailed tutorial written by Pete at diypete.com, who shares the step by step process for making a wonderful barrel coffee table from scratch. He also tells you what items you’ll need for this project and where to find them. For example, you can buy an old whiskey barrel online or from a local whiskey store for a few bucks, if you haven’t already got one.
Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.

When you are gathering inspiration for barn door Plan, be sure to note the cost of the tools used in the plan. Barn door tools can often cost more than your actual door! But, there are many clever and affordable do it yourself tools options in the tutorials mentioned below! Let us explore some DIY Barn Door Tutorials. Just click on the blue text below and check some amazing fun Barn doors. They might be different from the one shown in above picture.
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!

Who doesn’t want to have one awesome and handy wooden desk organizer that not only looks beautiful but can store all your mini office desk items properly? See the picture below. I am sure you will love this one. I have already built one myself as I just could not resist having one at my office. This thing easily stores all my office desk essentials, including pen, pencils, marker, small notebooks, etc. in the most organized way. You can see it yourself.
Description: Have you ever gone to one of those expensive framing shops and been taken back by the cost of a picture frame? Here is the opportunity to learn how to make your own frames and save money. The Picture Framing class will show you the basics for measuring and making your own picture frames. You will be shown how to use woodworking joinery that can be incorporated in your framing projects which are not only functional, but decorative as well. You will use the jointer and table saw to square stock, the table saw and the electric miter saw to cut mitered corners, and the router table to create assorted decorative profiles for your frames. Students will make the components for an 8" X 10" picture frame.
This is one of those things that you never know you need unless you have one. This amazing wooden sofa sleeve works perfectly on either or both sides of a sofa set. It gives your sofa a nice look. The sleeve can also be modified to include a cup holder, mobile holder, etc. You can easily find this item on any online furniture store, but an even better idea is to build one. This way, you can make a sofa sleeve design that you actually like and make space for cup and other things.
Description: In this workshop, Ray explains the different types and uses of period layout tools. It amazes people to leans how few furniture "Plans" were used in 18th century work. Sketches were made and basic principles were applied to derive at their measurements for quick and efficient use of shop time. Learn what the term "Shop Math" means as Ray demonstrates how to figure out measurements without the use of a ruler.
Description: Want to learn the basics of wood turning or refresh your skills from Jr. High shop class? This class covers the basics, including shop and lathe safety, tool identification and selection, mounting wood to the lathe and wood selection. In the first half of the class students will turn the handle for a 1/4" turning tool to take home. In the second half they will work on a small project determined by the instructor.
Description: This is a more in depth class about bench planes than above. In this class, let period furniture maker Ray Journigan show you how to make using a bench plane your new favorite go to tool. Lean what makes one plane better than another? Then Ray demonstrates the steps of flattening a wide board using hand planes followed by each student having the opportunity to surface a board to "finish ready" without any sanding using their hand planes. In this class we take the plane apart and explain all the adjustments to properly tune up your hand plane. Then block planes are discussed showing their importance in furniture work. Next, for those REALLY interested in learning how different types of handplanes were used, Ray will show and demonstrate the use of specialty planes such as Rabbit planes, Shoulder planes, Dado planes, Dovetail planes, Scraper planes, and molding planes. Lastly we turn our attention to sharpening to a razor edge. Student leave with an eye opening experience having learned thru practice, the joy and ease of using hand planes.
The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.
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