Description: With endless possibilities, your biggest challenge will be deciding what you can do next with your scroll saw. This tool opens up the worlds of intarsia, fretwork, marquetry, and inlay work, just to begin! Learn blade selection, tensioning, and the pros and cons of fixed speed versus various speed saws while making several take-home projects.
Build your own platform bed frame at your home by following the source linked tutorial given above. The source link also includes more pictures that can help you to build a better bed frame. You can see a step by step set of instructions and guidelines to follow with real life pictures, as well as you can download a PDF file detailing the list of materials and tools you’ll need, know about the length of every board, and most importantly color-coded illustrations of the building process.
Furnishing and decorating your patio is not an easy task – but then again, it has to be done! Your patio is obviously one of the most important rooms in your home, as you can easily turn it into your little piece of Heaven, your “safe spot” in your home where you can retreat whenever you want to ignore the world and just spend some time alone all by yourself.

Description: New to woodworking or looking to refresh your skills? What to see how someone else would do it? We have different Fundamentals classes where instructors teach you the skills to safely and properly use equipment, tools and jigs. In all classes you will learn about taking rough wood into a finished piece using the planer, jointer, mitersaw and tablesaw. In this class you will make a small sliding bookshelf.


Description: In this workshop, Ray shows and demonstrates the tools used to shape different furniture parts used in 18th century work. Tools such as spokeshaves, rasps and files, drawknives, scrapers, beaders and even some homemade tools that Ray uses to replicate period moldings and other features seen in period work. Other topics for shaping furniture parts will also be discussed such as steambending, bent laminations, and of course, carving.
Description: Without a doubt, the tablesaw is the most important power tool in the shop. Safely ripping stock to width, accurately cutting parts to length, cutting angles, bevels and making tenons and tapers are just a few of the tasks that an accurately set up tablesaw excels at. Understanding how the saw works is one of the goals of this new class and basic common sense safety will be covered thoroughly. We will begin with techniques to make safe and specialized cuts such as making accurate tenons and miters. Saw blade selection, dado blades and some of the commercially available accessories will be discussed. We will also demonstrate some basic but important shop made jigs. While this class will mostly be dom only, students will have the opportunity to do some cutting on the saw in order to make sure that each participant understands the techniques being shown.
With a pencil and a protractor, divide the larger disc into 30-degree wedges to create 12 center lines for the bottle indents. Center and trace the smaller disc on top of the larger disc. Next, with a drill press, drill 3/8-in.-deep holes on the 12 center lines with the 1-7/8-in. Forstner bit, spacing them between the disc’s outer edge and the traced circle. Next, divide the smaller disc into 60-degree wedges and drill six more 3/8-in.-deep holes with the Forstner bit.
We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.
Description: If you have taken Carving 101 and/or Chip Carving classes and want to work on basic techniques and interesting new patterns to develop your skills, this workshop is for you! Jim will help you refresh basic techniques and sharpen your skills through discussion and demonstration. He will share new patterns and refine your carving technique in a hands on practice clinic. Jim will also provide sharpening instruction to keep your tools cutting clean chips every time.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
It is one of the easiest woodwork projects we are going to discuss today. Although it looks very easy to make, I still could not find any good tutorial on the internet that explains how to build this one. So I am here sharing an article link that gets the closest. The article explains how to make different kinds of DIY candle holders and what items you may need for the project.
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.
The shelf in the first picture is made of red oak plywood. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. In case if you need more help understanding this project, you can refer the source link below. It discusses various items used, steps and tips and personal experience of the author who personally built a Zigzag shelf.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
×