Building a Wooden Office Desk Organizer is an easy task for a professional woodworker, but not so much for normal people like you and me. But that doesn’t mean you cannot do this. Two years ago, I had almost no woodworking experience, but now I make most of my household and office wooden items by myself. This saves me a lot of money. And believe me when I say this; you can also manage to make wonderful wood items with a little practice and some woodworking experience.
There’s something so satisfying about creating something out of nothing. That’s why we think woodworking is one of the greatest hobbies out there. You can create your very own functional pieces and add your own flare to it, feeling accomplished and proud every time you lay your eyes on your project. Plus, it’s a great way to stay under budget when decorating your home or giving beautiful gifts. In the long run, the price of lumber and tools is far less than the price of buying a piece new that would be simple to build at home.

This workshop introduces students to modern woodworking through an immersive experience of crafting fine wooden furniture. It is designed for beginners who want to get a hands-on introduction to woodworking and take home a beautiful product. After a brief survey of principles and process, students will dive into their projects to make a small wood...

Who doesn’t want to have one awesome and handy wooden desk organizer that not only looks beautiful but can store all your mini office desk items properly? See the picture below. I am sure you will love this one. I have already built one myself as I just could not resist having one at my office. This thing easily stores all my office desk essentials, including pen, pencils, marker, small notebooks, etc. in the most organized way. You can see it yourself.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Another awesome thing about this coffee table is that it is also has a storage unit. So you can store drinks, and other stuff in the half barrel of your table and then close or open it whenever you need. Pete has also constructed a video for this tutorial for which you can find the link below. It illustrates the same process in a video guide that shows you the exact process to be followed while building this whiskey barrel coffee table.
Description: In this workshop, period furniture maker Ray Journigan will explain what you will need to start adding carvings to you furniture. It all starts with the proper set up at the workbench. Ray explains the importance of good lighting. Watch Ray as he carves a scalloped shell to show the different body and hand Ray will also explain what is needed to keep those tools razor sharp. Face it, carving tools are expensive. Ray explains what makes a good carving chisel and which tools makes a good starter set. If you are new to the idea of carving, get all your questions answered here before you start buying those tools!

$360.00 (Includes all Materials)               . $100 Deposit (Balance due 30 days before class) There is nothing like the experience of using sharp tools. Where the actual tool does what you want it to do with ease. You should not have to fight with your tools. They should work for you and with you. In this class, we will cover a variety of techniques for sharpening edge tools including the use of Japanese water stones.…
Can you believe that this amazing wine rack the image below has been built using old wood pallets? Perhaps you can. Isn’t it wonderful that your old wood pallets can be reused to build something so beautiful and useful? I am not a drinker but I liked the idea so much that I just couldn’t resist making myself one. Although later I gifted it to my parents, who totally loved it.
There are many ways to learn woodworking.  Books and DVDs are a great source of information, and there's nothing wrong with trial ans error.  But if you really want to sharpen your skills or pick up a new technique, nothing beats a woodworking class. If you live within traveling distance of one of the many Rockler Woodworking and Hardware store's that offer classes, you're really in luck.  The woodworking classes held at Rockler retail stores are taught by experienced woodworkers who are enthusiastic about their craft.  Class sizes are small - 10 students or less in most cases - so you can expect the kind of individualized instruction that really helps when you're learning something new. Here's a sample of the great woodworking instruction upcoming at Rockler retail stores around the country:
This time I surprised one of my favorite dice games and took it outside. I made a set of wooden dice in just a few hours, and instead of sitting in the room and doing nothing, we are taking our dice game out into the yard. With this set of wooden dice, dice games are becoming our favorite backyard game. Check out the step by step tutorial below so you can make your own.
Whether you're new to woodworking or you've been doing it for years, Woodcraft's selection of woodworking projects is one the best places to find your next big project. Whether you're looking to make wooden furniture, pens, toys, jewelry boxes, or any other project in between, the avid woodworker is sure to find his or her next masterpiece here. Find hundreds of detailed woodworking plans with highly accurate illustrations, instructions, and dimensions. Be sure to check out our Make Something blog to learn expert insights and inspiration for your next woodworking project.
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